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ACM SIGCHI Bulletin 31

Editors:Ayman Mukerji
Dates:1999
Volume:31
Publisher:ACM
Standard No:ISSN 0736-6906; QA 76.9 P75 555
Papers:62
Links:Table of Contents
  1. SIGCHI 1999 Volume 31 Issue 1
  2. SIGCHI 1999 Volume 31 Issue 2
  3. SIGCHI 1999 Volume 31 Issue 3
  4. SIGCHI 1999 Volume 31 Issue 4

SIGCHI 1999 Volume 31 Issue 1

From the Editor

A Surprise Introduction to SIGCHI BIBPDF 1-2
  Ayman Mukerji

From the Chairs

Opening SIGCHI to the World BIBPDF 3-4
  Mike Atwood; Guy Boy

International CHI

Communicating with International Audiences BIBAPDF 5-6
  David G. Novick
Issues of international cooperation in the CHI community were made personal for me when I moved from the United States to France in July of 1996. Things that I should have noticed before, and which had slid right by me, all of a sudden became salient. For many people already immersed in internationally diverse work environments, much of this will probably be familiar. For those who tend to work within their own national environment, here are some observations and suggestions based on my experiences working in France that I hope will be of help. The most practical of these suggestions involve how to give a talk for an international audience, whether or not you're a native speaker of the meeting's target language.

Education

Degrees in Human-Computer Interaction: A Common Name is Emerging and Opportunities are Expanding BIBPDF 7-8
  Andrew Sears

Visual Interaction Design

Deer Hunter Bucks the Trend BIBPDF 9-12
  Shannon Ford

Kids and Computers

Designers of the Future BIBPDF 13-14
  Allison Druin; Alex Kruskal; Hanne Olsen; Isabe;la Revett; Thomas Plaisant Schwenn; Lauren Sumida; Rebecca Wagner

HCI and the Web

Building a Community Website, SIGCHI.NL goes Online BIBPDF 15-16
  Peter Boersma

Local SIGs

Starting a SIGCHI Local Group in the Netherlands BIBPDF 17-21
  Steven Pemberton

PAPERS

Innovation and Evaluation of Information Exploration Interfaces: A CHI98 Workshop BIBAPDF 22-25
  Gene Golovchinsky; Nicholas J. Belkin
This report summarizes a workshop held at CHI 98 that focused on several aspects of information exploration, including user interfaces, theory, and evaluation. Information exploration is a common activity that spans a variety of media and is an integral component of many information seeking behaviors that people engage in. The complexity of this activity, and the need to support it appropriately, led us to propose this workshop. Over the course of two days, we examined several aspects of this problem, struggled with a few definitions, and came away with a better understanding of the design space. Here we summarize those efforts.
Web Navigation Resolving Conflicts between the Desktop and the Web: A CHI98 Workshop BIBAPDF 26-28
  Carola Fellenz; Jarmo Parkkinen; Hal Shubin
This paper summarizes a workshop at CHI 98 that focused on navigational problems caused by differences in navigational models between the desktop and the Web. The goal of this workshop was to identify usability problems encountered when users move from the "traditional" desktop to the Web and to identify ways to minimize transfer-learning problems between the two platforms.
   The major outcome of the workshop was the classification of Web usage. We developed three categories: browsing, performing transactions and running applications. Each type of usage has its own characteristics and design requirements. In addition, we identified a category of application that interacts directly with the Internet, without needing a browser as an intermediary. We called these Net applications.
Mobile Informatics Innovation of IT Use in Mobile Settings: IRIS'21 Workshop Report BIBAPDF 29-34
  Steinar Kristoffersen; Fredrik Ljungberg
In this paper, we report from the workshop "Mobile Informatics: Innovation of IT use in mobile settings," arranged in conjunction with the IRIS'21 conference in Saeby, Denmark. We suggested Mobile Informatics as a field concerned with exploring new and innovative ways of using IT in mobile settings. By organizing the workshop, we attempted to introduce footholds for Mobile Informatics within the IRIS community. In particular, we wanted to explore the basis for such a field and elicit relevant issues for future research. The workshop was supported by the Swedish Information Technology Research Institute (SITI).
VRI'98 Visual Representations and Interpretations Workshop BIBAPDF 35-36
  Irene Neilson; Ray Paton
The value of multi-disciplinary research, the exchanging of ideas and methods across traditional discipline boundaries, is well recognised. Indeed, it could be justifiably argued that many of the advances in science and engineering take place because the ideas, methods and the tools of thought from one discipline become re-applied in others. Sadly, it is also the case that many subject areas develop specialised vocabularies and concepts and indeed may also approach more general problems in fairly narrow subject-specific ways. As a result barriers develop between disciplines that prevent the free flow of ideas and the collaborations that could often bring success. The VRI'98 workshop, which was held at the Foresight Centre at the University of Liverpool on September 22-24, 1998, was intended to break down such barriers.
The User Interface in Text Retrieval Systems Revisited, A Letter to the Editor BIBPDF 37
  Jef Raskin
Web Usability: A Review of the Research BIBAPDF 38-40
  Alfred T. Lee
As with the information technologies that have preceded it, Web technology is faced with many of the same issues of accessibility and usability. Paraphrasing the definition supplied by the ISO [1], Web usability is the efficient, effective and satisfying completion of a specified task by any given Web user. Support of essential user tasks made possible by Web technology serves is the benchmark of its usability. With this definition in mind, a brief review of available empirical research on Web usability was carried out to determine what is known about the factors that might affect Web usability. This review is not intended to be exhaustive nor is it intended as a review of the many design alternatives and suggestions that have been proposed for improving Web use. The primary purpose of this review is to identify Web-specific usability research and to provide some suggestions for future research.
A Journey into Web Usability: What an Informed Architect Learned on His Summer Vacation BIBPDF 41-42
  Steve Toub
SIGCHI Financial Report BIBPDF 43-44
  Jean Scholtz
The SIGCHI International Issues Committee Survey: A Brief Report BIBPDF 45-46
  Guy Boy

PUBLICATIONS: Books

Overviews and Reviews BIBPDF 47-48
  Karen McGraw
NEWSSIGCHI News BIBPDF 49-71
 
The Real World BIBPDF 74
  Lon Barfield
Image, Image: image, image, image BIBPDF 75
  Steven Pemberton

SIGCHI 1999 Volume 31 Issue 2

From the Editor

A Surprise Introduction to SIGCHI BIBPDF 1
  Ayman Mukerji

From the Chair

Two Significant Events BIBPDF 2-3
  Mike Atwood; Guy Boy

Education

HCI Education in Sweden BIBPDF 3-7
  Jan Gulliksen; Lars Ostreicher

Visual Interaction Design

That Visual Thing BIBPDF 8-9
  Frank M. Marchak; Shannon Ford

Local SIGs

Challenges Facing CHI Local SIGs BIBPDF 10-11
  Richard I. Anderson

Computers and Kids

Where is the Industry Going BIBPDF 12-13
  Allison Druin

Worldwide CHI

HCI in Germany -- Some Impressions and Facts from the Scene BIBPDF 14-16
  Peter Gorny; Horst Oberquelle

PAPERS

It's not Greek to Me: Terminology and the Second Language BIBAKPDF 17-24
  Giorgos Lepouras; George R. S. Weir
The localisation of software applications is a common way of avoiding 'second-language' difficulties but can lead to new problems in user interaction. One determinant of this condition is the selection of appropriate terminology for local language use. The present paper reports on a comparison of terminology from three leading word processor packages, in their English and Greek language varieties. Diversity in terminology, the resort to transliteration, and scope for neologism are characteristic results of localisation that underline the risks of confusion in the target user population. This paper discusses the possibility of preventative measures and offers a remedial approach to this problem for use in the considered applications.
Keywords: Human-computer interaction, Standardisation, Internationalisation, Localisation, Terminology, User support

REPORTS

User Centered Design -- Problems and Possibilities: A Summary of the 1998 PDC and CSCW Workshop BIBPDF 25-35
  Jan Gulliksen; Ann Lantz; Inger Boivie

Book Review

"Web Site Usability: A Designer's Guide," by Jared M. Spool, Tara Scanlon, Will Schroeder, Carolyn Snyder, Terri DeAngelo BIBPDF 26-37
  Karen L. McGraw
SIGCHI News BIBPDF 38-47
 

The Real World

Pointing BIBPDF 48
  Lon Barfield

SIGCHI 1999 Volume 31 Issue 3

From the Editor

Off to India BIBPDF 1
  Ayman Mukerji

From the Chair

A New Vision for SIGCHI BIBPDF 2-3
  Marilyn Tremaine

Education

Instilling Interdisciplinarity -- HCI from the Perspective of Cognitive Sciences BIBPDF 4-5
  Yvonne Rogers

Visual Interaction Design

Collaboration and Design from a Distance: University of Pennsylvania Law School Case Study BIBPDF 6-8
  Jodi Forlizzi; Laura Franz

Local SIGs

CHI Local SIGs in the Americas Outside of the U.S. BIBPDF 9-11
  Richard I. Anderson

Computers and Kids

What Happens when There is Research Funding for New Technologies for Children? BIBPDF 12-14
  Allison Druin; Kristian Simsarian

REPORTS

CSCW'98 Workshop Report: Collaborative and Co-Operative Information Seeking BIBPDF 15-18
  Elizabeth Churchill; Dave Snowdon; Joseph W. Sullivan; Gene Golovchinsky

Book Review

"User and Task Analysis for Interface Design," by JoAnne T. Hackos and Janice C. Redish BIBPDF 19-20
  Larry E. Wood

PAPERS

Strategies for a Better User Interface BIBAPDF 21-23
  Leonel Morales Diaz
Even though it has not been formally defined what a user-computer interface is; it is possible to describe the challenges and compromises a system designer must confront to approach that definition. The way those challenges and compromises are solved represents, more than a simple formalism, an strategy, which means, an ingenious solution not necessarily according to the traditional methods for problem solving. The challenges in the user interface design process may be a lot, so the strategies are also a lot, but, it is possible to organize that set of decisions into five principal groups:
  • 1. Challenges and strategies for representation
  • 2. Challenges and strategies for localization
  • 3. Challenges and strategies for acquisition and actualization
  • 4. Challenges and strategies for creation, change and destruction
  • 5. Challenges and strategies for action and response Confronting those five challenges and defining the corresponding strategies the complete design of a user-computer interface is achieved.
  • NEWS

    Events BIBPDF 24-26
     

    The Real World

    The Right Length BIBPDF 27
      Lon Barfield

    SIGCHI 1999 Volume 31 Issue 4

    From the Editor

    New Beginnings BIBPDF 1-2
      Joseph A. Konstan

    From the Chair

    Web Weaving BIBPDF 3
      Marilyn Tremaine; Wendy Mackay

    Education

    HCI Education -- People and Stories, Diversity and Intolerance BIBPDF 5-6
      Alan Dix

    Local SIGs

    CHI Local SIGs: Easy to Find at CHI 99 and, Increasingly, Throughout the World BIBPDF 7-9
      Richard I. Anderson

    Computers and Kids

    Four Years of CHIkids from a CHIkid! BIBPDF 11-12
      Allison Druin

    WORKSHOPS & PRE-CONFERENCE EVENTS

    A Research Agenda for Highly Effective Human-Computer Interaction: Useful, Usable, and Universal BIBPDF 13-16
      Jean Scholtz; Michael Muller; David Novick; Dan R., Jr. Olsen; Ben Shneiderman; Cathleen Wharton
    End User Programming / Informal Programming BIBAKPDF 17-21
      Howie Goodell; Sarah Kuhn; David Maulsby; Carol Traynor
    The phenomenon we call "programming" is not limited to regular professional programmers. Farthest away are end user programmers, who program just as a means to an end in their own professions. In between are people with very diverse backgrounds, general education, and programming knowledge. Like professional programmers, they write programs for others as their major job activity. Yet they also share characteristics of end user programmers, such as a strong specialization in one application area. All these "informal programmers" need more study and support to help them maximize their contributions.
    Keywords: End user programming (EUP), End user, Informal programming, Programming By Example (PBE), Programming By Demonstration (PBD), Domain-specific programming languages, Artificial intelligence (AI), Agents, Natural programming, Software user communities, Teaching programming, Learning programming, Open source, XML, Participatory Design (PD)
    Research Issues in the Design of Online Communities: Report on the CHI 99 Workshop BIBPDF 23-25
      Amy Bruckman; Judith Donath; Thomas Erickson; Wendy Kellogg; Barry Wellman
    Tool Support for Task-Based User Interface Design -- A CHI 99 Workshop BIBPDF 27-29
      Birgit Bomsdorf; Gerd Szwillus
    Interacting with Statistics -- A CHI 99 Workshop BIBPDF 31-35
      Michael Levi; Frederick Conrad
    Senior CHI -- The CHI 99 Development Consortium BIBPDF 37-42
      Jason B. Ellis; Sandra Kogan; Jim Rowan

    SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS

    SIGCHI's Role in Influencing Technology Policy BIBPDF 43-46
      Jeff Johnson
    SIGCHI User Interfaces for Electronic Product Catalogs BIBPDF 47-48
      Jurgen Koenemann; Markus Stolze
    Automated Data Collection for Evaluating Collaborative Systems BIBAPDF 49-51
      Jill Drury; Tari Fanderclai; Frank Linton
    The purpose of this CHI 99 Special Interest Group (SIG) session was to share lessons learned about using automated logging techniques to collect data for evaluating collaborative (multi-user) systems. Automated logging techniques are frequently used in evaluating the human-computer interaction of single-user systems. There has been much less experience in using logging techniques for evaluating collaborative systems, thus prompting the SIG proposal. We discussed issues surrounding using logging systems, methods, and metrics to collect data that are useful for evaluating collaborative systems.
    Universal Web Access: Delivering Services to Everyone BIBAPDF 53-54
      Gary Perlman
    The following made brief presentations on their work and/or views on universal accessibility. No topic encompassed all possible dimensions of accessibility, but the diversity of topics highlights the potential to broaden markets to include more users. One goal of the session was to to consider how to broaden these and other projects, while another was to determine how a community of people interested in accessibility can share resources. Part of the discussion attempted to answer what to do next. An online repository is being maintained at: http://www.acm.org/perlman/access/.

    CONFERENCE & PROGRAM REPORTS

    The Active Web BIBPDF 55-60
      Alan Dix; David Clarke
    "Proceedings Sharing Program" at CHI 99 BIBPDF 61
      Gary Perlman

    The Real World

    Telephones BIBPDF 64
      Lon Barfield