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ACM SIGCHI Bulletin 19

Editors:Peter Orbeton
Dates:1987-88
Volume:19
Publisher:ACM
Standard No:ISSN 0736-6906; QA 76.9 P75 555
Papers:55
Links:Table of Contents
  1. SIGCHI 1987 Volume 19 Issue 1
  2. SIGCHI 1987 Volume 19 Issue 2
  3. SIGCHI 1988 Volume 19 Issue 3
  4. SIGCHI 1988 Volume 19 Issue 4

SIGCHI 1987 Volume 19 Issue 1

Panel Session

Usability Testing in the Real World BIB 43-46
  Carol Bergfeld Mills; Kevin F. Bury; Catherine Marshall; Paul Reed; Teresa L. Roberts; Bruce Tognazzini; John Gould
A Comparison of Textual Information Retention from CRT Terminals and Paper BIBA 47-50
  Mitchell F. Wyle
An experiment measuring the difference in reading comprehension and retention between paper and CRT displays is described. Results, conclusions, and implications are presented. The results indicate that textual information is retained significantly better when it is presented on paper.

Trip Report

CSCW'86 Conference Summary Report BIB 51-53
  Herb Krasner
Computer-Supported Cooperative Work: Trip Report from the Conference in Austin, December 3-5, 1986 BIB 54-61
  Jakob Nielsen

SIGCHI 1987 Volume 19 Issue 2

Human Factors in Computer Systems: Some Useful Readings BIB 15-20
  Paul Green
How Faithfully Should the Electronic Office Simulate the Real One? BIBA 21-25
  Jeff Johnson
The naive answer to this question -- "as closely as possible" -- is wrong for several reasons. First, it fails to recognize that user dexterity in manipulating simulated objects on a computer screen is not as high as it is in the physical world. Second, it wrongly subordinates users' goals to the actions that they perform in the physical office to achieve those goals. Third, it often results in unnecessary development effort and poor system performance. Fourth, it limits the functionality of the system to that provided by its physical counterpart. Finally, it presents a user interface that, though familiar, may not be optimal. There is no simple rule for determining the correct level of detail that a Desktop Metaphor system should have. Such a determination requires either a careful analysis of the desired functionality (taking into account pragmatic considerations such as the difficulty of implementation) or considerable experience in designing such systems. Many developers lack such experience and are unwilling to do the necessary analysis, and thus wind up applying the naive approach. Some heuristics are presented to help guide designers away from the naive approach.
Software Development Snapshots: A Preliminary Investigation BIB 26-29
  Laura Marie Leventhal

Workshop Report

Classification of Dialog Techniques: A CHI+GI'87 Workshop, Toronto, April 6, 1987 BIB 30-35
  Jakob Nielsen

CHI+GI'87 Poster Session Papers and Abstracts

CHI+GI'87 Poster Session Papers and Abstracts BIB 36-57
  Aaron Marcus
Principles for the Design of Manuals: An Empirical Study and Production Rule Analysis BIB 37
  Richard Catrambone
PAC: An Object Oriented Model for Implementing User Interfaces BIB 37-41
  Joelle Coutaz
A User Interface Design Tool BIB 41-42
  David England
Experimentus Interruptus BIB 42-46
  Graeme E. Field
An Adaptive Graphics Analyzer as a Preference-Oriented Interface BIB 46-48
  Marek Holynski; Robert Garneau; Michael Lu
A Comparison of Tabular and Graphical Displays in Four Problem-Solving Domains BIB 49-54
  Mary J. LaLomia; Michael D. Coovert
Intelligent Systems Design: The Development of a Framework and Empirical Assessment of Knowledge Presentation and Reasoning in an Expert System Interface BIB 54-55
  Donna M. Lamberti
An Icon Design Manual Page for the User Interface of a CAD/CAM/CAE Workstation BIB 55
  Aaron Marcus; Michael Arent; Bruce Browne; Carl Jacobsen
Refining Early Design Decisions with a Black-Box Model BIB 55
  Andrew Monk
On-Line Documentation and Tutorials for an Integrated Graphical and Data Analysis System BIB 56
  David M. Stein
Graphical Entry of Weather Forecasts BIB 56-57
  R. K. R. Trafford

Trip Report

CHI+GI'87, Toronto, April 5-9, 1987 BIB 58-66
  Jakob Nielsen

SIGCHI 1988 Volume 19 Issue 3

Fun BIB 21-24
  John M. Carroll; John C. Thomas
A Brief Summary of the Background and Current Status of the HFS Human-Computer Interaction Standards Committee BIB 25-27
  Paul Reed
A Change of Mind or The Story of Fuzzies in Purgatory BIB 28-36
  Scott Luebking
Videotex Information Packagers: A Field Study Aimed at Tomorrow's Videotex Author Interface BIBAK 37-47
  John F. (Jeff) Kelley
Twenty-Three professional Videotex Information Packagers (VIP: graphic artists, database architects, wordsmiths, etc.) were interviewed about current work habits with an eye toward the implications for VIP automation. Interviews were taped and transcribed for semi-mechanized content analysis. Photographs of work areas and materials were also made. Observations include: heavy continuing reliance on paper notes and records; a frequently frustrated need on the part of VIPs for a variety of database listings in different formats (graphic and textual) at differing levels of detail; desperate need for more compatibility among the various hardware and software elements in the graphics/text/database synthesis process.
Keywords: General, Hardware / software interfaces, Software, Software psychology, Models and principles, User/machine systems, Human factors, Computer graphics, Graphics utilities, Graphics packages, Picture description languages, Text processing, Document preparation, Format and notation, Photocomposition, Arts and humanities, Arts, fine and performing, Experimentation, Human factors, Videotex, Information provider, Authoring system, Task analysis, Engineering psychology
The HCI Situation in Europe BIB 48-50
  Jakob Nielsen
HUFIT -- Human Factor Laboratories in Information Technology BIBA 51-54
  K. P. Fahnrich; J. Ziegler; M. Galer
The HUFIT (Human Factors in Information Technology) project is an extensive multinational project of cooperation in the area of ergonomics, in the design of IT products, in particular office systems. The project involves eleven institutions in eight European countries. This paper aims to provide a resume of the work done in the first two years of the project.

CHI+GI'87 Poster Session Papers and Abstracts

CHI+GI'87 Poster Session Papers and Abstracts BIB 55-81
  Aaron Marcus
User Interface Strategies for Large Maintenance Databases BIB 56
  Sai-Cheong Chu
Training Needs Assessment and Analysis of Management Information Systems for Naive Corporate Users: A Case Study BIB 56-61
  Michael D. Coovert
An Interference Theory Explanation of Retention Errors BIBA 61-63
  George Engelbeck; Peter G. Polson
We have extended Cognitive Complexity Theory (CCT) (Kieras and Polson, 1985) to provide an explanation of why some production rules are remembered and others are forgotten. The explanation is based on interference theory.
   Inconsistent user interfaces force users to learn different operations to accomplish common user goals. Such inconsistent knowledge is represented as two or more rules with common conditions and different actions. Let A represent the common condition and C and D represent different actions. The rules can be described as A-B and A-C which conform to a classical interference paradigm.
   Sixty subjects were trained to perform seven utility tasks on a popular, stand-alone, menu-based word processor. Subjects were brought back one day after the training session for a retention test. The retention test involved retraining subjects on the same set of utility tasks.
   Production rule models were written for all tasks. Each rule represents a step in one of the seven tasks. The rules were classified as A-B, A-C, or C-D rules. C-D rules are rules with a unique condition and action. The rule that appeared more frequently was predicted to interfere with the retention of the less frequent version of the rule (Postman & Underwood, 1973).
   Each step can be associated with a rule, and the number of errors were tabulated for each rule type. The overall probability of an error was .076. The observed probability of an error was .56 for the four low-frequency A-C rules. Over half the errors observed in this study were made on these four steps. The probability of an error on a low-frequency C-D rule was .005.
Transfer between Similar Menu Systems BIB 63-65
  Peter W. Foltz; Susan E. Davies; Peter G. Polson; David Kieras
A User Needs Approach to Context-Sensitive Help BIB 65-67
  Sigrid Grimm; Jolanta Malicki; Susan Obermeyer
The Effects of Frequency and Length of Commands and Training Transfer on Text Editing Performance BIB 67-69
  Virginia A. L. Gunther; Alexis Grosofosky; Daniel J. Burns; David G. Payne
A Natural Language Shell BIB 69
  Manton M. Matthews
Exploratory Evaluations of Two Versions of a Foot-Operated Cursor-Positioning Device in a Target-Selection Task BIBA 70-75
  Glenn Pearson; Mark Weiser
An investigation is on-going concerning the use of feet instead of hands to perform workstation cursor-positioning and related functions. In the exploratory studies reported here, two versions of a particular foot-operated device, the swing mole, were assessed against a mouse in a base-line target-selection task. The task had some of the elements involved in text editing, but did not directly include keyboard entry. The study showed that novices can learn to select fairly small targets using a mole, while revealing shortcomings in the current mole design and suggesting directions for redesign.
A Task-Oriented Prototyping Tool BIB 75-77
  Carol A. Rossi; Thomas S. Tullis
Are You a Better "Mouser" or "Trackballer"? A Comparison of Cursor-Positioning Performance BIB 77-81
  Barbra Bied Sperling; Thomas S. Tullis
Subliminal Presentation of Help Screens on a Microcomputer BIB 81
  F. Layne Wallace; J. Michael Flanery

Panel Session

The Politics of Human Factors BIB 82-84
  Jey Flick

Workshop Report

CHI+GI'87 Workshop on User Models BIB 85-87
  Gene Lynch; Jon Meads

SIGCHI 1988 Volume 19 Issue 4

INTERACT'87 Poster Session Papers and Abstracts

INTERACT'87 2nd IFIP Conference on Human-Computer Interaction Poster Session Abstracts BIB 11-26
  Peter Orbeton
Information Retrieval: The User-Interface BIB 12-13
  F. M. T. Brazier; J. J. Beishuizen
Automatic Formal Verification of Digital Systems Using Prolog BIB 13-14
  Zmago Brezocnik; Bogomir Horvat
Dominie: A Domain Independent Instructional Environment for Computer-Based Procedural Skills (ESPRIT Project 1613) BIB 14-15
  P. Byerley; P. Brooks; M. Mhende; M. Elsom-Cook; F. Spensley; M. Federici; C. Scaroni
Colab: Next Generation Meetings BIB 15-16
  Gregg Foster
Knowledge System for Supporting Statistical Analysis BIB 16-17
  Andras Gabor; Gyula Barna
ALCOSY: A Desktop-Style User Interface for Process Control BIB 17-18
  Andreas M. Heinecke
TEXTVISION: A Software Tool to Visualize Conceptual Knowledge Using the HYPERTEXT Metaphor BIB 18-21
  Piet Kommers
The Use of Biofeedback to Reduce Strain at Visual Display Unit Systems BIB 21-22
  Kurt Landau; Claudia Leonhardt
Graphical Support for Accessing a Knowledge Base BIB 22-23
  Rainer Melchert
HITEXS: A Context-Sensitive Interface for Cooperative Human-Machine Fault Diagnosis; Building Operator Tools for NASA's Space Station Thermal Management System BIB 24
  Renate Roske-Hofstrand; Roger Remington
Tools for Interactive System Design BIB 24-26
  Hartmut Weule; Lukas Loffler

Trip Report

Hypertext'87, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 13-15 November 1987 BIB 27-35
  Jakob Nielsen
INTERACT'87, Stuttgart, West Germany, 1-4 September 1987 BIB 36-42
  Jakob Nielsen