HCI Bibliography Home | HCI Journals | About SIGCHI | Journal Info | SIGCHI Journal Volumes | Detailed Records | RefWorks | EndNote | Hide Abstracts
SIGCHI Tables of Contents: 19202122232425262728293031

ACM SIGCHI Bulletin 28

Editors:Steven Pemberton
Dates:1996
Volume:28
Publisher:ACM
Standard No:ISSN 0736-6906; QA 76.9 P75 555
Papers:113
Links:Table of Contents
  1. SIGCHI 1996 Volume 28 Issue 1
  2. SIGCHI 1996 Volume 28 Issue 2
  3. SIGCHI 1996 Volume 28 Issue 3
  4. SIGCHI 1996 Volume 28 Issue 4

SIGCHI 1996 Volume 28 Issue 1

From the Editor

CHI as in arCHIve BIBAHTML 1
  Steven Pemberton
Introduction to a special issue on the history of SIGCHI.

From the Chairs

50 Years ACM, 14 Years SIGCHI BIBHTML 2-3
  Mike Atwood; Guy Boy
SIGCHI: The Early Years BIBHTML 4-6
  Lorraine Borman
SIGCHI: The Later Years: Interviews with Past Chairs BIBHTML 7-9
  Steven Pemberton
The SIGCHI Bulletin: Interviews with the Editors BIBHTML 10-13
  Steven Pemberton
The CHI Conference: Interviews with Conference Chairs BIBHTML 14-24
  Steven Pemberton

Education

HCI Education: Past, Present and Future? BIBHTML 25-27
  Jean B. Gasen

Students

The Evolution of the Student Experience: Interviews with Stuart Card and James Foley BIBHTML 28-31
  James E. Pitkow

Visual Interaction Design

Visual Interaction Design: Rites of Passage BIBHTML 32-33
  Maria G. Wadlow

Local SIGs

Conferences BIBHTML 34-35
  Kate Ehrlich

Standards

Simplifying Conformance BIBHTML 36-38
  Pat Billingsley

World-Wide CHI

Perspectives on Design and Internationalization BIBHTML 39-40
  John Karat; Clare-Marie Karat

Conference Report

Designing Interactive Systems: Ann Arbor, Michigan 23-25th August 1995 BIBHTML 41-42
  Alistair Sutcliff

A CHI '95 Workshop

Knowledge-Based Support for the User-Interface Design Process BIBHTML 43-47
  Kumiyo Nakakoji; Uwe Malinowski; Jonas Lowgren
Minimizing Bias in Computer Systems BIBHTML 48-51
  Batya Friedman; Eric Brok; Susan King Roth; John Thomas
The Denver Model for Groupware Design: (Yeeeeee Haaaaaa!) BIBAHTML 52-58
  Tony Salvador; Jean Scholtz; James Larson
The Denver Model is offered as a framework with which to plan or evaluate the capabilities associated with a particular groupware application. This model was the output of 14 participants at the two day workshop on Designing and Evaluating Groupware, held at CHI'95, Denver Colorado. The Denver Model consists of three submodels: goals and requirements, design and technology. A description of the framework is provided and evaluation strategies are described in this paper.
Why Don't More Non-North-American Papers Get Accepted to CHI? BIBAHTML 59-65
  Ellen A. Isaacs; John C. Tang
In this report, we describe how we carried out our analysis, explain our findings, and discuss some preliminary ideas about actions that might increase the participation of non-North Americans at CHI, should that be accepted as a goal.
"Finding and Reminding" Reconsidered BIBAHTML 66-69
  Scott Fertig; Eric Freeman; David Gelernter
In the July 1995 SIGCHI Bulletin, Deborah Barreau and Bonnie Nardi rightly point out that "every computer user spends enormous time and effort in filing and finding of electronic files, yet there has been very little research on the subject." To this end, Barreau and Nardi have investigated electronic filing and finding practices of the users of common desktop systems to determine "the factors affecting individual decisions to acquire, organize, maintain, and retrieve information." While we applaud their efforts to study the most basic aspects of user/computer interaction, we believe they draw the wrong conclusions from their own research. Our goal in this paper is to explain why.
Window Sharing with Collaborative Interface Agents BIBAHTML 70-79
  Charles Rich
An implemented system is described which allows a software agent to collaborate with a human user using a shared application window. The system automatically controls input permission and also provides mechanisms for signalling and communication. A generalization of the system to multiple users and agents, called NShare, is compared with common window-sharing tools, such as SharedX. This work is part of a larger agenda to apply principles of human collaboration and discourse structure to human-computer interaction using the interface agent paradigm.
SIGCHI News BIBHTML 81-82
 
CHI 96: A Preview BIBHTML 83-84
  Peter Stevens
CHI 96 Workshops BIBHTML 85-90
 

The Real World

Uppers and Downers BIBHTML 96
  Lon Barfield

Views and Feelings

Programmers Are Humans Too BIBAHTML 97
  Steven Pemberton
One of the pieces of evidence that HCI hasn't yet reached maturity is the fact that it is so difficult to write a GUI program.

SIGCHI 1996 Volume 28 Issue 2

From the Editor

WWW BIBAHTML 1
  Steven Pemberton
An introduction to an issue with many articles about the World Wide Web.

From the Chairs

Quiz BIBHTML 2
  Mike Atwood; Guy Boy
ACM SIGCHI Development Fund: Call for Proposals BIBHTML 3
 

Education

More Needles in the Haystack BIBHTML 4
  Jean B. Gasen
Teaching Human Computer Interaction to Programmers BIBHTML 5-6
  Saul Greenberg

Visual Interaction Design

"Enough is Enough, and Enough is Too Much!" BIBHTML 7
  Maria G. Wadlow

Standards

ANSI/HFES 200 Canvass Committee Now Forming BIBHTML 8-9
  Pat Billingsley

Local SIGs

World Wide Web BIBHTML 10-11
  Kate Ehrlich

Students

"So How Are Your Hands?": Thoughts from a CS Student with RSI BIBHTML 12-15
  Rob Jackson

A CHI '95 Workshop

Tools & Techniques in Visual Design Development BIBHTML 16-17
  Loretta Staples; Dan Boyarski; Eviatar Shafrir; Peter Vanags; Annette Wagner; Linda Wall
Cognitive Architectures and HCI BIBAHTML 18-21
  Susan S. Kirschenbaum; Wayne D. Gray; Richard M. Young
The Cognitive Architectures and Human-Computer Interaction Workshop examined computational cognitive modeling approaches to human-computer interaction issues (HCI). The five major architectures and variations represented were briefly summarized. Participants compared approaches to a set of selected HCI problems and alternative solutions, and compared the strengths and weaknesses of the architectures. A list of additional issues was generated and discussed.
Gesture at the User Interface BIBHTML 22-26
  Alan Wexelblat
OZCHI '95: 4th Australian Conference on Computer-Human Interaction BIBHTML 27
  Donald L. Day
Educating Computer People about People & Computers: Report on Conference Panel, HCI'95, Huddersfield BIBAHTML 28-31
  Philip J. A. Scown; Barbara McManus
This report describes a panel session on HCI Education held at the HCI'95 Conference. During the debate, expert views were expressed about many of the key issues affecting HCI teachers today, including: how can educators cope with the flood of new HCI ideas? should HCI be fully integrated into software engineering courses or taught in specialist modules? what are the core elements of HCI that all students should learn? there are perceived cultural differences in HCI teaching in the UK, USA and Scandinavia -- are these differences real and are they important? should we be sharing educational materials? can HCI design be taught or are creative designers born not bred?

Temporal Aspects of Usability

Temporal Aspects of Usability: Papers from a Workshop BIBAHTML 32
  Chris Johnson; Phil Gray
In July 1995, a workshop on 'Temporal Aspects Of Usability' was organised at the University of Glasgow. This was intended to provide a common forum for researchers in this area. The following contributions were submitted as position papers for this workshop. They fall into three broad themes.
Assessing the Impact of Time on User Interface Design BIBAHTML 33-35
  Chris Johnson; Philip Gray
Temporal properties of interaction have a profound impact upon the usability of human computer interfaces. Delays in response time can lead to frustration and error. The simultaneous presentation of many different pieces of information imposes heavy demands upon the cognitive and perceptual resources of system operators. These problems have been investigated by a number of recent research initiatives. Unfortunately, it has been difficult to replicate the results that have been obtained from experimental investigations. This creates significant problems for designers if these results are to guide the future development of interactive systems. This paper briefly describes how an multi-disciplinary team has addressed this problem during the Temporal Aspects of Usability (TAU) project.
Long-Term Variation in User Actions BIBAHTML 36-38
  Richard C. Thomas
There has been little research into the study of long term adaptation by users or the extent to which usage is enhanced over a substantial period [1]. However, there is general agreement that some interfaces, such as Unix shells and certain editors, take years to master. In this paper we present evidence that users do indeed change their actions in the long term. Some implications of our findings are discussed.
How Machine Delays Change User Strategies BIBAHTML 39-42
  Paddy O'Donnell; Stephen W. Draper
As machine response delays vary, the most important effect on users may be not their annoyance but that they change the way they use an interface. Even the very simple task of copytyping three digit numbers gives rise to at least three different user strategies (i.e. procedures). However the effect seems not be a simple function of delay length, contrary to earlier reported work. Instead users are probably shifting between strategies more fluidly.
Time Modelling in Petri Nets for the Design of Interactive Systems BIBAKHTML 43-46
  Philippe Palanque; Remi Bastide
This paper addresses the problem of the representation of time in interactive software models. We aim at providing solutions allowing the software designers to efficiently use time modelling during the design process, and to check that the software being built actually corresponds to the temporal requirements. The modelling approach makes a precise distinction between qualitative and quantitative time modelling. The qualitative aspects are presented according to basic constructs of Petri nets while quantitative aspects are introduced according to several extensions to the basic constructs of Petri nets. Each of those constructs is presented on a simple example.
Keywords: Formal models, Petri nets, Time modelling, Temporal relationships
Delays and Temporal Incoherence Due to Mediated Status-Status Mappings BIBAHTML 47-49
  Alan Dix; Gregory Abowd
The paper describes how the identification of 'status-status mappings' early in the specification and design of an interactive system can highlight potential temporal problems in the interface. These problems arise because without infinitely fast computation and communication, any constraints between status in the interface are bound to be violated some of the time. This violation will at best be a slight lag between the source of a change and its display and at worst may lead to inconsistency between parts of the interface. We identify the ways in which status-status mappings are violated and the way in which they are mediated by events in the implementation of a system. This enables the designer to control the eventual behaviour of the system and avoid the worst pitfalls.
Automated Verification of Temporal Dialogue Properties BIBHTML 50-52
  Gregory D. Abowd; Lein Ton
Time, Tasks and Errors BIBAHTML 53-56
  Bob Fields; Peter Wright; Michael Harrison
An aspect of usability that has often been downplayed in previous HCI modelling research involves time. Time dependencies and temporal constraints are an important aspect of action, and failure to meet them leads to an important class of human errors; many of the errors associated with safety critical systems have a significant temporal component. An attempt is made to show how properties and behaviours that are important from this temporal perspective may be modelled using concepts from our previous work [7] and using real-time CSP [2]; some of the issues and problems with such approaches are examined.
Including Time in the Notion of Interactor BIBAHTML 57-61
  M. Mezzanotte; F. Paterno'
The concept of an interactor is an abstraction which captures specific requirements of software objects which interact with users. The software architecture of an Interactive System can be built by composing instances of the interactor model which communicate with each other. The model allows designers and developers to identify easily the main elements to take into account in the selection of concrete instances of interaction objects and to develop software architectures in a systematic way. In [P94] a theory of user interaction objects was presented. This theory was developed mainly for graphical interaction objects and needs some extensions in order to capture the specific time requirements of multimedia user interfaces more efficiently. In this paper we give indications on how to perform such an extension.
The CHI '95 Conference Electronic Publication: Introduction to an Experiment BIBAHTML 62-75
  Robert Mack; Linn Marks; Dave Collins; Keith Instone
In the spring of 1994, the CHI '95 Conference Committee decided to produce an electronic Conference Proceedings and Companion, to be delivered on CD-ROM. The CD-ROM version of the Proceedings and Companion were delivered to attendees of the CHI '95 Conference. Soon after the conference, the fourth author created the World Wide Web, or "Web" version based on the CD-ROM contents, which is accessible via: http://www.acm.org/ in directories /sigchi/chi95/Electronic/chi95cd.htm. This report describes the rationale and development process for the CD-ROM, and introduces the ACM/SIGCHI experiment in electronic, Web-based Conference publication.
Interactive Video BIBAHTML 76-81
  Michael K. Stenzler; Richard R. Eckert
Having more effective communication devices allows one to create better teaching tools. Many studies have demonstrated that multimedia instructional applications are more effective than traditional teaching methods [1-5]. Interactive video will make these educational tools even more effective. One of the programs described in this paper gives an excellent example of this. That program allows a person to take video clips of herself speaking Chinese phrases and then compares those clips with clips of native Chinese speakers saying the same phrases. Because the program shows the user a video clip of the native speaker, the user can see how the speaker's mouth moves while speaking as well as being able to hear the correct pronunciation. This is helpful when trying to mimic the sounds. With this program, a Chinese language student can practice and perfect her pronunciation without the need of anyone else's assistance.

Book Review

"Designing Visual Interfaces," by Kevin Mullet and Darrell Sano BIBHTML
  Raghu Kolli
Dissertations BIBHTML 82-84
 
SIGCHI News BIBHTML 85-91
 

The Real World

Sticky Labels BIBHTML 95
  Lon Barfield

Views and Feelings

What Was the Subject of Titchner's Doctoral Thesis? BIBHTML 96
  Ed Chilton

SIGCHI 1996 Volume 28 Issue 3

From the Editor

Italy BIBHTML 1
  Steven Pemberton

From the Chairs

Questions and Answers and Requests for More Questions BIBHTML 2-3
  Mike Atwood; Guy Boy

World-Wide CHI

Cultural User Interfaces: A Silver Lining in Cultural Diversity BIBHTML 4-7
  Alvin Yeo

Visual Interaction Design

The Industrial Design of the Software Industry BIBHTML 8-11
  Brad Weed

Local SIGs

Students BIBHTML 12-13
  Kate Ehrlich

Education

Time Flies You Cannot They Fly Too Fast BIBHTML 14
  Jean Gasen

Students

Programming Languages: A Play in Three Acts BIBHTML 15-19
  Ben Anderson; Blair MacIntyre

Standards

Hail and Farewell BIBHTML 20
  Pat Billingsley
Field Oriented Design Techniques: Case Studies and Organizing Dimensions BIBHTML 21-26
  Dennis Wixon; Judy Ramey
Formal Specification of User Interfaces BIBHTML 27-33
  Christopher Rouff
Collective Learning and Collective Memory for Coping with Dynamic Complexity: Co-tech Workshop at ECSCW 95 BIBHTML 34-41
  Yvonne Wærn
ESP6 (or, Snowbound during the great storm of '96): 6th Workshop on Empirical Studies of Programmers, Alexandria, Virginia, USA, Jan 5-7 BIBHTML 42-43
  Deborah A. Boehm-Davis; Wayne D. Gray
In Search of Clickable Dons: Learning about HCI Through Interacting with Norman's CD-ROM BIBAHTML 44-47
  Yvonne Rogers; Frances Aldrich
As part of a university HCI course, masters students used and evaluated Norman's CD-ROM Defending Human Attributes in the Age of the Machine [1]. This paper reports on the advantages and disadvantages of the CD-ROM from the students' perspective, and reflects on the learning benefits of using this kind of interactive media. Problems with adapting existing books from paper to CD-ROM are discussed, and a number of suggestions are put forward of ways in which the interactivity of electronic media could be further exploited for teaching HCI and interface design.

HCI in Italy

HCI in Italy: An Overview of the Current State of Research BIBHTML 48-49
  Berardina Nadja De Carolis
A Visual Approach to HCI BIBAHTML 50-55
  P. Bottoni; M. F. Costabile; S. Levialdi; P. Mussio
The Pictorial Computing Laboratory (PCL) evolves its past experience in image processing and pattern recognition to the design of interactive systems. In the last ten years, a model for visual interactive computing has been developed based on the following abstraction: in interactive activities human beings communicate with computers through digital messages representing (part of) the state of the computation. Such a model, called Com2, is described, and an interaction with a system, developed following it, is shown as example, thus highlighting the use of visual languages for human-computer interaction.
A Visual Approach to Object-Oriented Analysis Based on Abstract Diagrams BIBAHTML 56-64
  M. Missikoff; R. Pizzicannella
Object-Oriented Analysis and Design (OOAD) methods are rapidly getting a wide consensus. They are mainly based on a diagrammatic approach. Diagrams are intuitive, fast to learn and easy to use. However, they lack of a formal basis and their semantics is mainly descriptive. Furthermore, validation and verification of analysis specifications are, to a large extent, performed manually. Conversely, formal specification methods, such as Z or Larch, do not guarantee the same level of intuitiveness and have not been conceived for a diagrammatic representation.
   In this paper we present a visual, diagrammatic OOAD method conceived to joining formality and intuitive user interaction. The method is organised in three layers. The external layer allows the user directly manipulate diagrams representing analysis specifications. The internal layer represents the formal model of the application being analysed. Then we have an intermediate layer that decouples the two, so that the external (presentation) layer has the independence from the formal layer that allows the flexibility to meet at the best the interaction needs of the user. The proposed method has been embodied in Mosaico, an O-O conceptual modeling tool developed at IASI-CNR.
Task-Centred Design: Turning Task Modelling into Design BIBAHTML 65-70
  P. Marti
A task-centred approach to systems design and evaluation is presented. In particular, task analysis and task modelling are described as major human factors tools for a structured user-centred and task-centred design methodology. It will be shown how these techniques can be exploited throughout the development process, and their beneficial effects in terms of software usability.
Reasoning on Gestural Interfaces through Syndetic Modelling BIBAHTML 71-76
  G. P. Faconti
This paper builds on previous works carried within the ESPRIT Amodeus project and shows how a new approach to human-computer interaction, called syndetic modeling, can be used to gain insight into user-oriented properties of interactive systems. The word syndesis comes from the ancient greek and means conjunction. It is used to emphasize the key point of this approach: user and system models are described within a common framework that enables one to reason about how cognitive resources are mapped onto the functionality of the system.
Moving Tasks at the Center of the Development, Execution and Evaluation Process BIBAHTML 77-81
  Fabio Paterno'
This paper shows how the concept of user task can be used to drive various phases of the design process. The basic idea is to create a direct correspondence between user tasks and the software components needed to perform them. This leads to such results as the design of functionalities which are easier to use, task-oriented help, and the evaluation of users sessions with respect to their tasks.
A Tool to Support Specification and Evaluation of Context-Customized Interfaces BIBAHTML 82-88
  Fiorella de Rosis; Sebastiano Pizzutilo; Berardina De Carolis
This paper describes a tool which aims at responding to the mentioned objectives: XDM (Context-Sensitive Dialogue Modeling) extends Coloured Petri Nets to specify context-customized interfaces in a task-based way and to simulate their behaviour in defined contexts. By integrating this modeling approach with KLM theory [2], XDM also enables evaluating (in an automatic or semi-automatic way) whether the interface is correct and usable.
A Multiparadigmatic Environment for Interacting with Databases BIBAHTML 89-96
  T. Catarci; M. F. Costabile; A. Massari; L. Saladini; G. Santucci
We present a prototype system to be used for visually accessing heterogeneous databases. The basic idea is to provide the user with several visual representations of data as well as multiple interaction mechanisms for both querying databases and visualizing the query results. Since some visual representations better fit certain user classes, the system adapts to the user's needs by switching to the most appropriate visual representation and interaction mechanism, according to a suitable user model. The data and query representations are consistent in every paradigm. Such a notion of consistency stems from formal basis, i.e. a twofold data/representation model, namely the Graph Model, and a set of basic Graphical Primitives. This formal approach allows the user to switch from one interaction paradigm to another, always saving the query state.
Virtual ECHO: An Interface for a Simulated Environment BIBAHTML 97-101
  Daniela Meloni; Alessandro Mura; Francesco S. Nucci; Angelo Cangelosi; Maria Beatrice Ligorio
ECHO is a simulated environment with multimedia technology aimed to training specialized technical staff in using radar techniques. The system was designed using the user-centered perspective and a relevant knowledge acquisition phase in order to define a suitable Human-Computer Interface. The interface chosen for the system is the visit metaphor in order to leave the student free in exploring a virtual environment.
   ECHO was designed by the Advanced Methodologies and Interface Design group (MEDIA group), of the L.I.T (Laboratory of Information Technologies) of the Alenia
   The paper, after a brief MEDIA group description, discusses the theory (as the theoretical framework and system architecture), as well as the user interface specific aspects (as the basic idea, the functionalities, and the interface structure). Finally the paper describes some implementation notes.
Human-Computer Interaction through Natural Language and Hypermedia in AlFresco BIBAHTML 102-107
  Oliviero Stock; Carlo Strapparava; Massimo Zancanaro
Multimodality is a powerful concept for dealing with dialogue cohesion in a Human-Computer Natural Language centered system. Two issues, important for a the more effective exploitation of the potentially large bandwidth of communication provided by this situation are presented: (i) the integration of navigational and mediated aspects of interaction; (ii) the use of a graphical representation of the dialogue structure to allow the possibility of direct manipulation. Examples from real interaction with AlFresco, a prototype for art exploration, are used to give a concrete idea of the implemented concepts.
Building Interfaces as Personal Agents: A Case Study BIBAHTML 108-113
  Amedeo Cesta; Daniela D'Aloisi
This paper concerns the development of interfaces which perform tasks on behalf of the user. Recently the concept of task delegation has gained consideration due to the increasing number of assignments that are quite repetitive and tedious, like dealing with electronic messages, managing personal agendas, retrieving data and information in remote and distributed repositories. These tasks are generally connected to the development of computer networks. The design of such interfaces presents a high degree of complexity since the relationship with the user and his needs is very critical: in most cases the user wants to control the jobs to be mechanized but in the same time he wants to be free from wasting his time in performing repetitive patterns of actions. In this paper the main problems concerning the design of active and cooperative interfaces are investigated. Then a solution is proposed based on the approaches of software agents and distributed architectures. Starting point of the project is to integrate and make accessible different tools and applications regularly utilized by a user: all these elements concur in building a flexible and scalable environment that the user can access through intelligent agents that work as interfaces.
The Management of Human Errors in User-Centered Design BIBAHTML 114-119
  A. Rizzo; O. Parlangeli; E. Marchigiani; S. Bagnara
User-Centered Design puts the users at the center of the design activity by involving them from the very beginning in the process and by iteratively testing and re-designing the product. In every testing and evaluation phase human error analysis plays an important role. Although it is not possible to design systems in which people do not make errors, much can be done to minimize the incidence of error, to maximize error detection, and to make easier error recovery. However, the qualitative analysis on human error has not received the attention that it deserves. In the paper the main features of the user-centered approach are sketched and a set of guidelines for handling human error is presented. An example drawn from our design experience is reported for each guideline.

Book Review

"Multimedia and Hypertext: the Internet and Beyond," by Jakob Nielsen BIBHTML 120-122
  Bert Bos
SIGCHI News BIBHTML 123
 

The Real World

Waiting BIBHTML 127
  Lon Barfield

Views and Feelings

Beep Beep! BIBAHTML 128
  Steven Pemberton
An invective harangue against unnecessary noise in user interfaces.

SIGCHI 1996 Volume 28 Issue 4

From the Editor

CHI 96 BIBHTML 1
  Steven Pemberton

From the Chairs

SIGCHI Annual Report BIBHTML 2-3
  Mike Atwood

World-Wide CHI

The Voluntary Workcamps Association of Ghana's Computer Literacy/Distance Learning Project: Appeal for Equipment and Financial Support BIBHTML 4-6
  Osei Darkwa

Standards

A Look Ahead and an Overview BIBHTML 7-9
  Harry E. Blanchard

Visual Interaction Design

Time to Go BIBHTML 10
  Maria G. Wadlow

Education

Some Progress and Some New Questions BIBHTML 11-14
  Andrew Sears

Local SIGs

The Year-Round CHI Conference: At a Local SIG Near You BIBHTML 15-16
  Richard Anderson

Students

A Common Ground between Student Volunteers & the CHI 96 Community BIBHTML 17-19
  Sara Rochelle Parsowith; Carol Traynor
CHI 96: Interviews with the Conference Co-Chairs BIBHTML 20-22
  Steven Pemberton

A CHI 96 Workshop

User-Centred Design Principles: How Far Have They Been Industrialised? BIBHTML 23-25
  Ian McClelland; Bronwen Taylor; Bill Hefley
Educating HCI Practitioners: Evaluating What Industry Needs and Academia BIBHTML 26-28
  Andrew Sears; Mary Czerwinski; Laurie P. Dringus; Barbara Bernal Thomas
Designing the User Interface for Speech Recognition Applications BIBHTML 29-34
  Amir Mane; Susan Boyce; Demetrios Karis; Nicole Yankelovich
Transforming User-Centered Analysis into Concrete Design BIBHTML 35-38
  Larry E. Wood; Ron Zeno
The HCI Professional as Consultant BIBHTML 39-41
  Heather Desurvire; Lauren Schwartz
HCI and the Web BIBHTML 42-45
  Keith Instone
Formal Methods in Computer Human Interaction: Comparison, Benefits, Open Questions BIBHTML 46-48
  Fabio Paterno'; Philippe Palanque
Psychological Issues of Virtual Environment Interfaces BIBHTML 49-53
  Casey Boyd; Rudy Darken
Reflections on the CHI 96 Doctoral Consortium BIBHTML 54-55
  Stacie Hibino

A CHI 96 Special Interest Group

Common Ground for CHI Students at CHI 96 BIBHTML 56
  Casey Boyd; Jennifer Kay
What I Learned at CHIkids BIBHTML 57-60
  Allison Druin

Usability Management Maturity, Part 1

Self Assessment -- How Do You Stack Up? BIBHTML 61-62
  George A. Flanagan

Usability Management Maturity, Part 2

Usability Techniques -- What Can You Do? BIBHTML 63-65
  Thyra Rauch; Susan Kahler; George Flanagan

Symposium Report

Usability Engineering: Industry-Government Collaboration for System Effectiveness and Efficiency BIBHTML 66-67
  Laura L. Downey; Sharon J. Laskowski; Elizabeth A. Buie; H. Rex Hartson

Report on the British HCI Group Symposium, 1st May, 1996

The Missing Link: Hypermedia Usability Research & The Web BIBHTML 68-75
  Simon Buckingham Shum
"Cool Stuff and Hot Interfaces": The Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory's 13th Annual Symposium and Open House BIBHTML 76-78
  Jennifer L. DePaul; Thomas T. Hewett
The Attributistical Understanding of Information: Its Evaluation and Its Consequences for the Soft Redesign of User Interface Screens BIBAKHTML 79-84
  Gunter Dubrau
Good interface and screen redesign needs a fundamental theory based on philosophical reflections. Only in this way is there a possibility of an accurate theory discussion. This way will also open up the opportunity for computer and information scientists to understand basic principles on designing human-computer interfaces. With such a background they will be able to work with other scientists on the mosaic field of HCI.
   In this paper I show a bridge beginning at the one end with philosophical reflections on the term of information, going on with the properties of the information and an evolution of this theory made as a part of my thesis for doctoral degree. The other end of the bridge are empirical investigations on effects of redesigning user interface screens in existing information systems made with ToolBook, WinHelp and Internet HTML. This redesign is based on recommendations made as consequences of the evaluated attributistical understanding of the information. Another consequence presented briefly in this paper are complex changing tools.
Keywords: Attributistical information theory, Screen redesign recommendations, Effects of redesign of existing user interfaces, Complex changing tools

Book Review

"Scenario-Based Design: Envisioning Work and Technology in System Development," edited by John M. Carroll BIBHTML 85-86
  Paul McInerney
SIGCHI News BIBHTML 87-90
 

The Real World

Cooking BIBHTML 95
  Lon Barfield

Views and Feelings

Never is a Long Time BIBAHTML 96
  Steven Pemberton
Reflections on how changing screen technology may affect how we use computers.