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ACM SIGCHI Bulletin 24

Editors:Bill Hefley
Dates:1992
Volume:24
Publisher:ACM
Standard No:ISSN 0736-6906; QA 76.9 P75 555
Papers:29
Links:Table of Contents
  1. SIGCHI 1992 Volume 24 Issue 1
  2. SIGCHI 1992 Volume 24 Issue 2
  3. SIGCHI 1992 Volume 24 Issue 3
  4. SIGCHI 1992 Volume 24 Issue 4

SIGCHI 1992 Volume 24 Issue 1

Trip Report

Exploring HCI Into the '90s: CHISIG Australia 1990 Conference Report BIB 14-17
  Gitte Lindgaard
INTERACT'90 BIB 18-21
  Lisa Neal

Papers

Field Research in Product Development BIB 22-27
  Karen H. Kvavik; Danielle Fafchamps; Sandra Jones; Shifteh Karimi

Workshop Report

Report on the CHI '91 UIMS Tool Developers' Workshop BIB 28-31
  Sylvia Sheppard
A Metamodel for the Runtime Architecture of an Interactive System BIB 32-37
 

SIGCHI 1992 Volume 24 Issue 2

Workshop Report

Context: In the Eyes of Users and in Computer Systems BIBA 12-21
  Helen Maskery; Jon Meads
This is the report of a workshop on context held at CHI'89. It describes the workshop and contains a summary of the main results which were agreed to by all workshop participants. The bulk of the report is provided by the three 'special groups', whose discussions filled most of the workshop's second day.
Context: What Does it Mean to Application Design BIBA 22-30
  Helen Maskery; Gord Hopkins; Tim Dudley
This is the report of a workshop held at CHI'90. It describes the discussions and findings of the two days. The report starts with definition of terms. It moves on to look at the goals and benefits of including context in applications. Next the report presents some cautions to developers and finally, the report covers the discussions about real applications which might include context-sensitivity.

Papers

An Updates on the CHI'92 Video Program BIB 31-40
  James Alexander; Dennis R. Goldenson
Minimalism Reconsidered: Should We Design Documentation for Exploratory Learning? BIB 41-50
  Thomas R. Williams; David K. Farkas

SIGCHI 1992 Volume 24 Issue 3

Papers

Socially Responsible Computing I: A Call to Action Following the L.A. Riots BIB 14-15
  Ben Shneiderman
Socially Responsible Computing II: First Steps on the Path to Positive Contributions BIB 16-17
  Ben Shneiderman

Conference Report

Empirical Studies of Programmers: Fourth Workshop BIBA 18-23
  Jared T. Freeman
The fourth annual workshop of Empirical Studies of Programmers was a forum for psychological studies of computer assisted instruction, documentation and programming formats, and cooperative work. Experiments concerning fundamental psychological mechanisms were also presented. In this review of the event, panel discussions and papers are summarized.

Trip Report

Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences BIB 24-29
  E. Eugene Schultz
Hypertext'91, 15-18 December 1991, San Antonio, Texas BIB 30-39
  Lynda Hardman

Papers

HILITES -- The Information Service for the World HCI Community BIBAK 40-49
  Brian Shackel; James L. Alty; Peter Reid
The Hci Information and LITerature Enquiry Service (HILITES) has been developed from two initiative over the years, one being a series of research projects and the other a service development on a commercial basis. In this paper the user's needs for information services are discussed, and the developments leading to HILITES are reviewed. The facilities provided by HILITES are outlined, including the on-line database containing over 25,000 items of literature available for on-line search, the weekly accessions list and request service, the copy and/or loan service of hard copies to subscribers, and related special services. The latest development (November 1991) has been the release of the HILITES database on CD-ROM.
Keywords: Abstracts, Bibliographies, CD-ROM, Databases, Grey literature, Human-computer interaction (HCI), Information sources, Information search and retrieval, Literature reviews, References, Service

SIGCHI 1992 Volume 24 Issue 4

International Perspectives: Some Dialogue on Scenarios

Some Dialogue on Scenarios BIB 7
  Clare-Marie Karat; John Karat
Scenario? Guilty! BIB 8-9
  Morten Kyng
Multiple Uses of Scenarios: A Reply to Campbell BIB 10
  Richard M. Young; Philip J. Barnard
What's In a Scenario? BIB 11-12
  Peter Wright
The Use of Scenarios in Design BIB 13-14
  Bonnie A. Nardi
Further Uses of "Scenario" BIB 15
  David Reisner
Categorizing Scenarios: A Quixotic Quest? BIB 16-17
  Robert L. Campbell

Standards Factor

Draft Standard Acquitted in Mock Trial BIB 18-19
  Jackie Schrier; Evelyn Williams

Papers

Remembering Allen Newell BIB 22-24
  Stuart Card; Thomas Moran; George Robertson

Trip Report

The Third Conference on Organizational Computing, Coordination and Collaboration BIBA 25-26
  Larry Press
This note reports on the Third Conference on Organizational Computing, Coordination and Collaboration (OC3), where professors of business and industrial practitioners gathered in a workshop atmosphere to discuss CSCW.

Papers

Directions and Implications of Advanced Computing: A Report from Berkeley BIBA 27-30
  Doug Schuler
What relevance do computing and computer professionals have for the "real world?" This important question is infrequently addressed by computer professionals and the institutions -- academic, corporate, and governmental -- in which they're involved. The biannual "Directions and Implications of Advanced Computing" symposia, sponsored by Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility were established to address the wide ranging social implications of computing that often are given inadequate consideration. This report discusses some of the themes of the latest "Directions and Implications of Advanced Computing" (DIAC-92) Symposium that was help in Berkeley, California in May, 1992.
Cultural Diversity in Interface Design BIB 31
  Christine L. Borgman
The Interactive Matrix Chart BIBA 32-38
  Shaun Marsh
This paper presents a method for mapping a table of quantitative data onto a unique graphical presentation, called an interactive matrix chart. Each chart consists of a grid containing graphical marks in each of the cells, and these marks may vary in color, size, shape and other characteristics.
   The chart may be manipulated through both a simplification and a query mechanism. Simplifying the interactive matrix chart involves rearranging rows and columns of the chart. Querying the interactive matrix chart involves redesigning the individual marks meant to represent the underlying data. By simplifying and querying the interactive matrix chart, different patterns of marks are rendered, and therefore, different relationships between the data are revealed.
The Interactive Matrix Chart BIBA 39-41
  Robin Jeffries; Heather Desurvire
Recent research comparing usability assessment methods has been interpreted by some to imply that usability testing is no longer necessary, because other techniques, such as heuristic evaluation, can find some usability problems more cost-effectively. Such an interpretation grossly overstates the actual results of the studies. In this article, we, as authors of studies that compared inspection methods to usability testing, point out the rather severe limitations to using inspection methods as a substitute for usability testing and argue for a more balanced repertoire of usability assessment techniques.