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interactions 11

Editors:Steven Pemberton
Dates:2004
Volume:11
Publisher:ACM
Standard No:ISSN 1072-5520
Papers:106
Links:Table of Contents
  1. INTER 2004 Volume 11 Issue 1
  2. INTER 2004 Volume 11 Issue 2
  3. INTER 2004 Volume 11 Issue 3
  4. INTER 2004 Volume 11 Issue 4
  5. INTER 2004 Volume 11 Issue 5
  6. INTER 2004 Volume 11 Issue 6

INTER 2004 Volume 11 Issue 1

Editoral

Scents and sensibility BIBFull-Text 4
  Steven Pemberton

Ten years of interactions

Ten years of interactions BIBFull-Text 6-7
 

What's happening

What's happening BIBFull-Text 9-10
  Marisa Campbell

Research alert

Reading patterns and usability in visualizations of electronic documents BIBFull-Text 11-12
  Kasper Hornbaek; Erik Frokjaer

Design

Are agile methods good for design? BIBFull-Text 14-23
  John Armitage

Business

To innovate or not to innovate... BIBFull-Text 24-31
  Lyle Kantrovich

The whiteboard

Digging in the wrong spot BIBAFull-Text 32-39
  Larry Marine
Ever feel that you were spinning your wheels improving an interface? You made change after change, enhancement after enhancement, all based on design guidelines and usability testing -- but nothing seemed to move the product very far toward helping your users accomplish their goals. Maybe you had your sights set on the wrong target. Maybe you were digging in the wrong spot. In this Whiteboard, Larry Marine describes two kinds of digging spots -- one straightforward and one less obvious -- and explains why and how to dig for the more elusive treasure.
  • -- Elizabeth Buie
  • Fast forward

    The next revolution: vehicle user interfaces BIBAFull-Text 40-47
      Aaron Marcus
    Imagine having to think about safety, usability, and aesthetics issues for the user interface of a two-ton mobile device hurtling through space at 100 km/hr. Now you get the picture.
    Making Scents: aromatic output for HCI BIBFull-Text 48-61
      Joseph Jofish Kaye

    HCI and the Web

    Foraging a la carte: an appetite for popup menus? BIBFull-Text 63-64
      William Hudson

    Books

    Books BIBFull-Text 65-66
      James Kalbach

    Conferences

    CHI 2004 BIBFull-Text 67-70
      Marisa Campbell

    Reflections

    Scratching someone else's itch: (why open source can't do usability) BIBAFull-Text 72
      Steven Pemberton
    Every good work of software starts by scratching a developer's personal itch.
  • -- Eric Raymond,
  • The Cathedral and the Bazaar
       There's a closely related issue, however that I don't know how to solve yet without a big player with a lot of money, which is doing systematic user interface end user testing. We're not very good at that yet, we need to find a way to be good at it.
  • -- Eric Raymond,
  • Why Open Source will Rule
  • INTER 2004 Volume 11 Issue 2

    Editoral

    The development consortium BIBFull-Text 4
      Steven Pemberton

    Research alerts

    Collaboration usability analysis: task analysis for groupware usability evaluations BIBFull-Text 7-8
      David Pinelle; Carl Gutwin; Saul Greenberg

    Business

    Remote possibilities?: international usability testing at a distance BIBFull-Text 10-17
      Susan Dray; David Siegel

    Design

    BabelVision: better image searching through shared annotations BIBFull-Text 18-26
      Ken Haase; David Tames

    Fast forward

    Patterns within patterns BIBFull-Text 28-34
      Aaron Marcus

    The whiteboard

    Accessibility: it's not just for disabilities any more BIBAFull-Text 36-41
      Larry Hull
    Many of us think of Web accessibility in terms of accommodating users with disabilities, particularly visual disabilities. Larry Hull sees it as a wee bit more than that. In this Whiteboard he tells us why, and proposes a different way of addressing accessibility -- an approach that just might surprise us. -- Elizabeth Buie

    HCI and the challenges of mass communications

    Can HCI shape the future of mass communications? BIBFull-Text 44-47
      Nico Macdonald
    From customization to ubiquitous personalization: digital identity and ambient network intelligence BIBFull-Text 48-50
      Norman Lewis
    Main HCI issues for the design of interfaces for ubiquitous interactive multimedia broadcast BIBFull-Text 51-53
      Anxo Cereijo Roibias; Riccardo Sala
    There's no such thing as an "average" user BIBFull-Text 54
      Neil F. Budde
    E-mail and ease of use: a preferred method of mass communication with Internet users BIBFull-Text 55-56
      Mark Hurst
    Anthropomorphizing mass communication BIBFull-Text 57-ff
      Nick Bryan-Kinns; Peter Broadbent
    Imagining tomorrow's news BIBFull-Text 58
      Dan Gillmor
    Audience design: interacting with networked media BIBFull-Text 60-63
      Ann Light
    What recreational telephone conferencing can teach us about the future of mass communications BIBFull-Text 63-67
      Darren Reed
    Can HCI deliver on its promise? BIBFull-Text 65
      Andrew Zolli
    Networked information services in context-sensitive environments BIBFull-Text 67-69
      Giles Rollestone
    HCI can raise the level of discourse on the Web BIBFull-Text 70
      Michael Schrage
    Meta-design for sensible information BIBFull-Text 71-73
      Louis Weitzman
    A need to commune BIBFull-Text 74-75
      Ann Light
    The future's here;: it's just unevenly distributed BIBFull-Text 76-79
      Lorenzo Wood; Luke Skrebowski
    HCI and mass communications: assessing the road ahead BIBFull-Text 80-81
      Andrew Zolli
    Attention deficit disorder BIBFull-Text 81-84
      Luke Skrebowski

    HCI and the Web

    Applying research to design: bridging a widening gap BIBFull-Text 85-86
      William Hudson

    Books

    Books BIBFull-Text 87-88
      Kim Goodwin

    INTER 2004 Volume 11 Issue 3

    Editoral

    A little personalization goes a long way BIBFull-Text 4
      Steven Pemberton

    What's happening

    What's happening BIBFull-Text 7-8
      Marisa Campbell

    Research alert

    Patterns of cooperative interaction: linking ethnomethodology and design BIBFull-Text 9-10
      David Martin; Ian Sommerville

    Business

    Making the business our business: one path to value-added HCI BIBFull-Text 12-17
      Gitte Lindgaard

    Design

    In praise of tweaking: a wiki-like programming contest BIBFull-Text 18-23
      Ned Gulley

    Fast forward

    User-experience planning for corporate success BIBFull-Text 24-27
      Aaron Marcus

    Whiteboard

    Are you positive? BIBAFull-Text 28-33
      Aaron Sklar; David Gilmore
    When someone says "design evaluation," what comes to your mind? I'll bet that, like me, you probably think first of the process of identifying a design's flaws and inadequacies. David Gilmore and Aaron Sklar think otherwise. Calling on us to take inspiration from a recent movement in psychology, David and Aaron urge the usability profession to adopt a positive attitude, to enlarge our focus from problem sniffing to a broader scope that includes appreciating design goodness where it already exists. -- Elizabeth Buie
    Personalizing shared ubiquitous devices BIBFull-Text 34-43
      David M. Hilbert; Jonathan Trevor

    HCI and the Web

    My place or yours: use and abuse of research facilities BIBFull-Text 45-46
      William Hudson

    Books

    Books BIBFull-Text 47-49
      Gerard Torenvliet

    Conferences

    SIGGRAPH 2004 BIBFull-Text 51-54
      Marisa Campbell

    Reflections

    VUIs: where the rubber hits the road BIBFull-Text 56-ff
      Brian Ganninger

    INTER 2004 Volume 11 Issue 4

    Editorial

    Banking BIBFull-Text 4
      Steven Pemberton

    What's happening

    What's happening BIBFull-Text 7-8
      Marisa Campbell

    Research alert

    DateLens: a fisheye calendar interface for PDAs BIBFull-Text 9-10
      Benjamin B. Bederson; Aaron Clamage; Mary P. Czerwinski; George G. Robertson

    Fast forward

    Insights on outsourcing BIBFull-Text 12-17
      Aaron Marcus

    Design

    Mixing disciplines in anticipation of convergence: a curriculum for teaching interaction design to industrial designers BIBFull-Text 18-23
      Jon Kolko

    Business

    Describing usability problems: are we sending the right message? BIBFull-Text 24-29
      Joseph S. Dumas; Rolf Molich; Robin Jeffries

    The whiteboard

    Premium usability: getting the discount without paying the price BIBAFull-Text 30-37
      Jeff Sauro
    The debate rages. "Formal usability testing costs too much," says one side. "We need methodological rigor," maintains the other. "You can find the important problems with just five users," insists the first. "Such a small number doesn't give us reliable results," counters the second.
       And never the twain shall meet.
       Or will they? In this Whiteboard, Jeff Sauro explores the issues and gives us some ideas for maintaining the statistical validity of our usability testing as we reduce its costs. -- Elizabeth Buie
    Trading system complexity: keeping the trader in control BIBFull-Text 38-53
      Mark R. Hicks

    HCI and the Web

    Inclusive design: accessibility guidelines only part of the picture BIBFull-Text 55-56
      William Hudson

    Books

    Books BIBFull-Text 57-59
      Marc Rettig

    Conferences

    The 18th British HCI Group annual conference BIBFull-Text 61-63
      Marisa Campbell

    Reflections

    The power of two BIBFull-Text 64
      Steven Pemberton

    INTER 2004 Volume 11 Issue 5

    Editorial

    Emotion BIBFull-Text 4
      Steven Pemberton

    Obituary

    John Rheinfrank (1944-2004) BIBFull-Text 5
      Austin Henderson

    What's happening

    What's happening BIBFull-Text 9-10
      Marisa Campbell

    Research alert

    Modeling individual and collaborative construction of jigsaws BIBFull-Text 11-12
      Hilary Johnson; Joanne Hyde

    Fast forward

    Branding 101 BIBAFull-Text 14-21
      Aaron Marcus
    In 2001, CHI featured an unusual panel session: Marketing people were actually invited to come to CHI to explain what they did and why it was important to the objectives of SIGCHI. Boyd de Groot, Peter Eikelboom, and Florian Egger organized the session in which I was privileged to participate. As they remarked about how extraordinary it was to have dedicated marketing professionals at CHI, especially in presenter roles, the comments being exchanged among CHI professionals gave me the feeling that I was in a "Dilbert" comic strip, listening to the amusing, outrageous jibes of those characters.

    Business

    The myths of usability ROI BIBAFull-Text 22-29
      Daniel Rosenberg
    As I have followed the ongoing discussion in our field about usability ROI, I have consistently had the feeling that this debate is taking place on a different planet than the one I am familiar with. From my perspective, as an executive overseeing the user experience (UE) group at the world's second largest software company, much of this debate is based on misconceptions. As I stated in a recent talk at Xerox PARC hosted by BayCHI [7], in my 20 plus years of experience, I have never been asked to produce an ROI analysis.

    The whiteboard

    Log on, tune in, drop down: (and click "go" too!) BIBAFull-Text 30-35
      Ken Becker
    Every one of us, I'll bet, can recall numerous encounters with Web drop-down lists that behave differently from what we expect. Sometimes they go off and act on our selections before we're ready, leaving us shrieking ("Stop, I haven't finished!"); other times we wait patiently for something to happen, not realizing we have to click a "Go" button. Arguing for consistency in the "Go" direction, Ken Becker explains why going "Go-less" overloads the drop-down and reduces user control. -- Elizabeth Buie

    More funology

    Introduction BIBFull-Text 36-37
      Mark Blythe; Marc Hassenzahl; Peter Wright

    More funology: positions

    Beyond fun BIBFull-Text 38-40
      John M. Carroll
    Interview with Patrick Jordan BIBFull-Text 40-41
      Mark Blythe
    Technology as experience BIBFull-Text 42-43
      John McCarthy; Peter Wright
    Interview with Don Norman BIBFull-Text 43-46
      Mark Blythe; Mark Hassenzahl
    Emotions can be quite ephemeral; we cannot design them BIBFull-Text 46-48
      Marc Hassenzahl
    Designing for fun: how can we design user interfaces to be more fun? BIBFull-Text 48-50
      Ben Shneiderman

    More funology: inspiration

    Pastiche scenarios BIBFull-Text 51-53
      Mark Blythe
    Cultural probes and the value of uncertainty BIBAFull-Text 53-56
      William W. Gaver; Andrew Boucher; Sarah Pennington; Brendan Walker
    When reason is away, smiles will play.
  • -- Paul Eluard and Benjamin Peret
  • More funology: humor

    LOL: humor online BIBFull-Text 57-58
      Jeffrey T. Hancock

    More funology: design

    Freedom of fun, freedom of interaction BIBFull-Text 59-61
      Stephan Wensveen; Kees Overbeeke; Tom Djajadiningrat; Steven Kyffin
    It felt like clown sparkles BIBFull-Text 61-63
      Kristina Andersen
    Taking fun seriously BIBFull-Text 63-64
      Alan Dix
    What sounds do people love and hate? BIBFull-Text 64-66
      Jonathan Effrat; Lisa Chan; B. J. Fogg; Ling Kong
    Feeling lucky?: emotions and information seeking BIBFull-Text 66-67
      James Kalbach
    Connecting mothers and sons: a design using routine affective rituals BIBFull-Text 68-69
      Wouter van der Hoog; Pieter Jan Stappers; Ianus Keller

    More funology: games

    Beyond usability in games BIBFull-Text 70-71
      Randy Pagulayan; Keith Steury
    Computer games as interfaces BIBFull-Text 71-72
      Dennis L. Chao
    Narrative construction as play BIBFull-Text 73-74
      Brenda Laurel

    More funology: elephants

    Human computer (sexual) interactions BIBFull-Text 75-76
      Mark Blythe; Mark Jones
    The age of auspicious computing? BIBFull-Text 76-77
      Genevieve Bell

    HCI and the web

    Breadcrumb navigation: there's more to hansel and gretel than meets the eye BIBFull-Text 79-80
      William Hudson

    Books

    Books BIBFull-Text 81-83
      Will Schroeder

    Conferences

    NordiCHI 2004 BIBFull-Text 85-88
      Marisa Campbell

    INTER 2004 Volume 11 Issue 6

    Editorial

    Goodbye! BIBFull-Text 4
      Steven Pemberton

    What's happening

    What's happening BIBFull-Text 7-8
      Marisa Campbell

    Research alert

    In Pursuit of Desktop Evolution BIBFull-Text 9-10
      Pamela Ravasio; Sissel Guttormsen Schar; Helmut Krueger
    Usability and collaborative aspects of augmented reality BIBFull-Text 11-15
      Morten Fjeld

    Fast forward

    It's about time BIBAFull-Text 16-21
      Aaron Marcus
    What is it about time that fascinates us so much? Perhaps we are challenged because time is not resident in any particular object that we can hold, but we can see its effects when we stare at the sweeping second hand, at leaves turning a color for another cycle of the seasons, or at the face of an old friend whom we have not seen in years. We become aware of time if we are forced to sit still, or look at speeded-up or slowed-down (time-lapse) photography, film, or video, but most often when we see the world in motion, dynamically evolving. Philosophers, poets, physicists, painters, and psychologists have spent their lives analyzing the etiology (causes and beginnings), ontology (essence), eschatology (end), and epistemology (what we can know) of time. Across most civilizations, cultures, and historic epochs, analysts and synthesizers (that is, designers) have tried to explore what we understand about time and how we can use this knowledge.

    Design

    Animated use sketches as design representations BIBAFull-Text 22-27
      Jonas Lowgren
    Interaction design requires many forms of externalization. At certain points in the process, there is a need for design representations that (1) explore the intended use situation in some detail, and still (2) appear tentative enough to afford participation and engagement by intended users and other stakeholders. The designer's task is often to create ideas on the not-yet-existing. The envisioned use situations increasingly involve complicated technology, mobile use and demanding physical environments. Under these conditions, a third requirement on the representation technique is that it (3) allows for expression of ideas and use situations that would be impractical or impossible to create in conventional prototyping techniques. (An obvious example is the observation that lo-fi paper prototypes are of limited use for virtual reality design.)

    Business

    When good things happen to bad products: where are the benefits of usability in the consumer appliance market? BIBAFull-Text 28-35
      Timo Jokela
    Consider the following three stories about usability and consumer appliances.
  • A cellular phone with significant usability problems was launched. Still, the
       product was a great sales success and many users even seemed to have enjoyed
       using the product.
  • A new generation game device was developed. It had usability problems that
       led to wide-spread user dissatisfaction and the reputation of the product
       was severely damaged.
  • Some users of a new generation smart phone were happy with the product while
       others rejected it, finding its usability problems intolerable.
  • The whiteboard

    The race of the web sites: 2004 BIBAFull-Text 36-43
      Kathy E. Gill
    Four years ago the usability nod, like the popular vote, went to Democratic candidate Al Gore, and the review revealed common flaws as well as notable differences. In the intervening four years, surveys from organizations like the Pew Research Center show that more Americans are on line, and Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean legitimized the Internet as a medium for political activism and fundraising. So how well are today's candidates communicating with this medium?
    The blind men and the elephant: views of scenario-based system design BIBAFull-Text 44-53
      Kentaro Go; John M. Carroll
    Six blind men encounter an elephant. Each of them touches a different part of the elephant and expresses what the elephant is. Although they are touching the same elephant, each man's description is completely different from that of the others. We have been using this story as a metaphor for understanding different views of scenario-based system design.

    HCI and the web

    Attentional gambling: getting better odds from your web pages BIBFull-Text 55-56
      William Hudson

    Books

    Books BIBFull-Text 57-59
      Francesco Cara

    Conferences

    CSCW 2004 BIBFull-Text 61-63
      Marisa E. Campbell

    Reflections

    Things that stay us from the swift completion of our appointed tasks (revisited) BIBFull-Text 64
      Steven Pemberton