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interactions 15

Editors:Richard Anderson; Jon Kolko
Dates:2008
Volume:15
Publisher:ACM
Standard No:ISSN 1072-5520
Papers:121
Links:Table of Contents
  1. INTER 2008-01 Volume 15 Issue 1
  2. INTER 2008-03 Volume 15 Issue 2
  3. INTER 2008-05 Volume 15 Issue 3
  4. INTER 2008-07 Volume 15 Issue 4
  5. INTER 2008-09 Volume 15 Issue 5
  6. INTER 2008-11 Volume 15 Issue 6

INTER 2008-01 Volume 15 Issue 1

Welcome

Interactions: experiences, people, technology BIBFull-Text 4-5
  Richard Anderson; Jon Kolko

Ps AND Qs

What's in a name?: idioms, metaphors, and design BIBFull-Text 6-10
  Elizabeth Churchill

OK/CANCEL

Being popular BIBFull-Text 9
  Tom Chi; Kevin Cheng

FEATURE

Primal interactions BIBFull-Text 11-12
  Alex Wright

(P)REVIEW

Glut: mastering information through the ages BIBFull-Text 13-14
  Fred Sampson

FEATURE

Realizing the vision of mobile spatial interaction BIBFull-Text 15-18
  Peter Froehlich; Lynne Baillie; Rainer Simon
The linguistic command line BIBFull-Text 19-22
  Aza Raskin
Understanding convergence BIBFull-Text 23-27
  Stefana Broadbent; Valerie Bauwens

Key process, management & organizational interactions

Toward a model of innovation BIBFull-Text 28-36
  Hugh Dubberly

FEATURE

The business of customer experience: lessons learned at Wells Fargo BIBFull-Text 38-43
  Secil Watson

(P)REVIEW

Design education for business and engineering management students: a new approach BIBFull-Text 44-45
  Terry Winograd

FEATURE

Designing for disagreement BIBFull-Text 46-51
  Paul Burke

THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT

Halo 3: the theory and practice of a research-design partnership BIBFull-Text 52-55
  Dennis Wixon; Randy Pagulayan

Addressing critical challenges

Designing for the last billion BIBFull-Text 56-58
  Gabriel White

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

New users, new paradigms, new challenges BIBFull-Text 59-60
  Gary Marsden

SUSTAINABLY OURS

Two digital divides and four perspectives BIBFull-Text 61-66
  Eli Blevis

LIFELONG INTERACTIONS

My father's kitchen table BIBFull-Text 67-68
  Allison Druin

THE WAY I SEE IT

Filling much-needed holes BIBFull-Text 70-71
  Donald A. Norman

TRUE TALES

Persona non grata BIBFull-Text 72-73
  Steve Portigal

Forum: Timelines

Unanticipated and contingent influences on the evolution of the internet BIBAKFull-Text 74-78
  Glenn Kowack
Glenn Kowack, a pioneering networking entrepreneur, is writing a book about forces underlying unforeseen consequences in uses of digital technologies. This excerpt provides a fascinating perspective on the evolution of the Internet. Glenn and I have been good friends since w e met in late 1978 in the Tampa airport, waiting for a flight to Havana to have a look at life on the other side of the Iron Curtain. We found music, color, socioeconomic equality, and daiquiris, but not much venture capital. -- Jonathan Grudin
Keywords: HCI History

Interactions cafe

On innovation, appropriateness, intervention design... BIBFull-Text 80-ff
  Richard Anderson; Jon Kolko

INTER 2008-03 Volume 15 Issue 2

Welcome

Interactions: bridging communities BIBFull-Text 4-5
  Richard Anderson; Jon Kolko

FEATURE

When users "do" the Ubicomp BIBFull-Text 6-9
  Antti Oulasvirta

Ps AND Qs

Designing for digital archives BIBFull-Text 10-13
  Elizabeth Churchill; Jeff Ubois

THE WAY I SEE IT

A fetish for numbers BIBFull-Text 14-15
  Donald A. Norman

SUSTAINABLY OURS

Situated sustainability for mobile phones BIBFull-Text 16-19
  Elaine M. Huang; Khai N. Truong

TRUE TALES

Everybody's talkin' at me BIBFull-Text 20-21
  Steve Portigal

Forum: Timelines

Themes in the early history of HCI -- some unanswered questions BIBAKFull-Text 22-27
  Ronald M. Baecker
Ron Baecker's initial chapter in the 1987 volume of readings that he wrote and edited with Bill Buxton was a very influential reflection on HCI history. It was widely read, reprinted, and served as a model or starting point for subsequent histories. In this review of major themes, Ron poses questions and encourages us to seek out answers while we can. In the 1970s and 1980s I worked for two leading technology companies that eventually went out of business. They left surprisingly few traces. It would be ironic to lose knowledge of the origins of an industry that may preserve almost everything that transpires in the future. Ron's questions demand continued attention; finding the answers may require years of effort. -- Jonathan Grudin
Keywords: HCI History

Design: what it is, and how to teach and learn it

Pencils before pixels: a primer in hand-generated sketching BIBFull-Text 28-36
  Mark Baskinger

FEATURE

The future of interaction design as an academic program of study BIBFull-Text 38-41
  Kevin Conlon

THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT

Playcentric design BIBFull-Text 42-45
  Tracy Fullerton

OK/CANCEL

Failed games BIBFull-Text 45
  Tom Chi; Kevin Cheng

FEATURE

How I learned to stop worrying and love the hackers BIBFull-Text 46-49
  Carla Diana
Empowering kids to create and share programmable media BIBFull-Text 50-53
  Andrés Monroy-Hernández; Mitchel Resnick

(P)REVIEW

UIGarden.net: a cross-cultural review BIBFull-Text 54-56
  Neema Moraveji; Zhengjie Liu

Forum: On modeling

The analysis-synthesis bridge model BIBFull-Text 57-61
  Hugh Dubberly; Shelley Evenson

FEATURE

An ode to TomTom: sweet spots and baroque phases of interactive technology lifecycles BIBFull-Text 62-66
  Jan Borchers
What robotics can learn from HCI BIBFull-Text 67-69
  Aaron Powers

(P)REVIEW

The design of future things BIBFull-Text 70-71
  Gerard Torenvliet

LIFELONG INTERACTIONS

Designed to include BIBFull-Text 72-75
  Mark Baskinger

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

Raising a billion voices BIBFull-Text 76-79
  Sheetal K. Agarwal; Arun Kumar; Sougata Mukherjea; Amit A. Nanavati; Nitendra Rajput

Interactions cafe

On logic, research, design synthesis... BIBFull-Text 80-ff
  Richard Anderson; Jon Kolko

INTER 2008-05 Volume 15 Issue 3

Looking at things differently

Interactions: a new renaissance of worlds colliding BIBFull-Text 5
  Richard Anderson; Jon Kolko

FEATURE

Designing from the inside/out BIBFull-Text 6-10
  Laura Seargeant Richardson

Forum: On modeling

The experience cycle BIBFull-Text 11-15
  Hugh Dubberly; Shelley Evenson

FEATURE

Take a chance on me: using randomness for the design of digital devices BIBFull-Text 16-19
  Tuck Leong; Steve Howard; Frank Vetere
What do we mean by "Program"?: the convergence of architecture and interface design BIBFull-Text 20-26
  Benjamin H. Bratton

SUSTAINABLY OURS

Images of sustainable interactions: seeing with the lens of sustainability BIBFull-Text 27-29
  Eli Blevis; Shunying Blevis

Forum: Timelines

Travel back in time: design methods of two billionaire industrialists BIBAKFull-Text 30-33
  Jonathan Grudin
In this column we take a break from HCI history to revisit two earlier 20th-century technology successes. Rather than moving bits, these were people-movers. Early in the century, Henry Ford revolutionized the design, manufacture, and use of automobiles. Subsequently, Howard Hughes revolutionized the design and use of aircraft. Each was a self-taught engineer who created an industry that changed the world.
Keywords: HCI History

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Clues and solutions BIBFull-Text 35-ff
  Richard Anderson; Jon Kolko

THE WAY I SEE IT

Waiting: a necessary part of life BIBFull-Text 36-37
  Donald A. Norman

Ps AND Qs

Keep your hair on: designed and emergent interactions for graphical virtual worlds BIBFull-Text 38-41
  Elizabeth F. Churchill

LIFELONG INTERACTIONS

Designing online interactions: what kids want and what designers know BIBFull-Text 42-44
  Allison Druin

OK/CANCEL

Parents just don't understand BIBFull-Text 44
  Tom Chi; Kevin Cheng

THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT

HCI impact and uncitedness BIBFull-Text 45-47
  John Hopson

TRUE TALES

The journey is the reward BIBFull-Text 48-50
  Steve Portigal

Optimistic futurism

Optimistic futurism BIBFull-Text 52-54
  Richard Seymour

FEATURE

Dancing in the streets BIBFull-Text 55-59
  Scott Palmer; Sita Popat

(P)REVIEW

Merging design, business, and sustainability: the designers accord BIBFull-Text 61-66
  Allison Arieff; Valerie Casey

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

UCD in Chinese IT enterprises BIBFull-Text 68-70
  Zhengjie Liu; Zhiwei Guo; Kai Qian; Huiling Wei; Ning Zhang

FEATURE

Into the groove: lessons from the desktop music revolution BIBFull-Text 72-78
  David Cronin

Interactions cafe

On the experience ecosystem, drama, choreography... BIBFull-Text 80-ff
  Richard Anderson; Jon Kolko

INTER 2008-07 Volume 15 Issue 4

WELCOME

Interactions: a quiet call to arms BIBFull-Text 5
  Richard Anderson; Jon Kolko

The changing relationships between producers and consumers

Changing energy use through design BIBFull-Text 6-12
  James Pierce; David Roedl

Forum: ON MODELING

Learning curves for design BIBFull-Text 13-16
  Hugh Dubberly

FEATURE

Organic digital marketing 2.0 BIBFull-Text 17-21
  Conor Brady
Mashing up the marketing mix: introducing the 6th P...play BIBFull-Text 22-25
  Michael Graber
Knowledge architecture that facilitates trust and collaboration BIBFull-Text 26-30
  Xanthe Matychak

TRUE TALES

Hold your horses BIBFull-Text 32-33
  Steve Portigal

FEATURE

The dilemma of the shared mobile phone -- culture strain and product design in emerging economies BIBFull-Text 34-39
  Apala Lahiri Chavan; Douglas Gorney

Ps AND Qs

Maps and moralities, blanks and beasties BIBFull-Text 40-43
  Elizabeth F. Churchill

LIFELONG INTERACTIONS

Older adults, health information, and the internet BIBFull-Text 44-46
  Bo Xie

THE WAY I SEE IT

Workarounds and hacks: the leading edge of innovation BIBFull-Text 47-48
  Donald A. Norman

Forum: Timelines

Tag clouds and the case for vernacular visualization BIBAKFull-Text 49-52
  Fernanda B. Viégas; Martin Wattenberg
Most HCI history articles trace digital developments back to the 1980s, 1960s, or earlier. Information visualization is moving so rapidly that it's great to have a look back and glance forward on tag clouds, just over a decade old in digital form, from leading visualization researchers Fernanda Viégas and Martin Wattenberg. -- Jonathan Grudin
Keywords: HCI History

FEATURE

Designing worth -- connecting preferred means to desired ends BIBFull-Text 54-57
  Gilbert Cockton

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

Involving local undergraduates in fieldwork BIBFull-Text 58-60
  Matthew Kam

FEATURE

The theory of conservation of complexity BIBFull-Text 61-63
  David Bishop
Web-conscious content experiences BIBFull-Text 64-67
  Luke Wroblewski

(P)REVIEW

Web form design: filling in the blanks BIBFull-Text 68-70
  D. Philip Haine

OK/CANCEL

Top 10 BIBFull-Text 70
  Tom Chi; Kevin Cheng

FEATURE

Interaction design for software engineering: boost into programming future BIBFull-Text 71-74
  Claude Knaus
Image search at the speed of thought BIBFull-Text 76-77
  Santosh Mathan

Interactions cafe

On marketing, sustainability, and pessimism... BIBFull-Text 80
  Richard Anderson; Jon Kolko

INTER 2008-09 Volume 15 Issue 5

Welcome

Interactions: we're not in Kansas anymore BIBFull-Text 5
  Richard Anderson; Jon Kolko

FEATURE

Experiential aesthetics: a framework for beautiful experience BIBFull-Text 6-10
  Uday Gajendar
Intimate interactions: online representation and software of the self BIBFull-Text 11-15
  Jeffrey Bardzell; Shaowen Bardzell

SUSTAINABLY OURS

Personal inventories in the context of sustainability and interaction design BIBFull-Text 16-20
  William Odom; Eli Blevis; Erik Stolterman

LIFELONG INTERACTIONS

Memory impairment is a family affair BIBFull-Text 21-23
  Mike Wu

FEATURE

Life at the margins: assessing the role of technology for the urban homeless BIBFull-Text 24-27
  Christopher A. Le Dantec

Old models no longer suffice

Toto, I've got a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore... BIBFull-Text 28-34
  Meredith Davis

Forum: ON MODELING

Design in the age of biology: shifting from a mechanical-object ethos to an organic-systems ethos BIBFull-Text 35-41
  Hugh Dubberly

Ps and Qs

Open, closed, or ajar?: Content access and interactions BIBFull-Text 42-44
  Elizabeth F. Churchill; Mark Vanderbeeken

THE WAY I SEE IT

Simplicity is not the answer BIBFull-Text 45-46
  Donald A. Norman

OK/CANCEL

Applied science BIBFull-Text 46
  Tom Chi; Kevin Cheng

FEATURE

What should be automated? BIBFull-Text 47-49
  Matti Tedre

TRUE TALES

Living in the overlap BIBFull-Text 50-51
  Steve Portigal

FEATURE

Ignorance of interaction programming is killing people BIBFull-Text 52-57
  Harold Thimbleby
Mental and conceptual models, and the problem of contingency BIBFull-Text 58-64
  Charles Hannon

Forum: Timelines

Why Engelbart wasn't given the keys to Fort Knox: revisiting three HCI landmarks BIBAKFull-Text 65-67
  Jonathan Grudin
A well-attended event at CHI 2008 was "Usability Evaluation Considered Harmful," featuring a critique of CHI reviewing practices by Saul Greenberg and Bill Buxton [1]. They argued that three HCI landmarks, featured in most HCI histories, omitted studies of use and therefore would have fared poorly at the hands of CHI reviewers. They wrote: "Usability evaluation, as practiced today, is appropriate for settings with well-known tasks and outcomes. Unfortunately, [it fails] to consider how novel engineering innovations and systems will evolve and be adopted by a culture over time." Greenberg and Buxton stress that the CHI community needs to be far more liberal in considering what makes a valuable contribution.
   Agreed, but on careful examination each of these early contributions has more to say about HCI history and practice than is generally noted.
Keywords: HCI History

FEATURE

Let's get physical BIBFull-Text 68-72
  Gretchen Anderson
The researcher-tool mismatch: improving the fit between user researchers and technology BIBFull-Text 74-78
  Rob Tannen

Interactions cafe

On addressing wicked problems... BIBFull-Text 80
  Richard Anderson; Jon Kolko

INTER 2008-11 Volume 15 Issue 6

Welcome

Interactions: having an impact BIBFull-Text 5
  Richard Anderson; Jon Kolko

Emerging approaches to research and design practice

Designing games: why and how BIBFull-Text 6-12
  Sus Lundgren

ON MODELING

An evolving map of design practice and design research BIBFull-Text 13-17
  Liz Sanders

THE WAY I SEE IT

Signifiers, not affordances BIBFull-Text 18-19
  Donald A. Norman

FEATURE

User experience design for ubiquitous computing BIBFull-Text 20-22
  Mike Kuniavsky
Cultural theory and design: identifying trends by looking at the action in the periphery BIBFull-Text 23-25
  Christine Satchell

LIFELONG INTERACTIONS

Understanding children's interactions: evaluating children's interactive products BIBFull-Text 26-29
  Janet C. Read; Panos Markopoulos

Forum: Timelines

An exciting interface foray into early digital music: the Kurzweil 250 BIBAKFull-Text 30-32
  Richard W. Pew
This is Richard Pew's second Timelines contribution. He describes twists and turns in designing a groundbreaking digital synthesizer -- inspired by Stevie Wonder and built by Ray Kurzweil. Kurzweil is the inventor also known for pioneering work in optical character recognition (OCR), speech technologies, and predictions that we are bearing down on a technological singularity. Pew was program chair for the first official CHI Conference in 1983 and participated on three panels at CHI'86. He has been president of the Human Factors Society and was the first chair of the National Research Council Committee on Human Factors. -- Jonathan Grudin
Keywords: HCI History

TRUE TALES

Some different approaches to making stuff BIBFull-Text 33-34
  Steve Portigal

FEATURE

Design: a better path to innovation BIBFull-Text 35-41
  Nathan Shedroff

SUSTAINABLY OURS

A call for pro-environmental conspicuous consumption in the online world BIBFull-Text 42-45
  Bill Tomlinson

Ps and Qs

Of candied herbs and happy babies: seeking and searching on your own terms BIBFull-Text 46-49
  Elizabeth F. Churchill

FEATURE

Experiencing the International Children's Digital Library BIBFull-Text 50-54
  Benjamin B. Bederson
Taken for granted: the infusion of the mobile phone in society BIBFull-Text 55-58
  Rich Ling

(P)REVIEW

How society was forever changed: a review of The Mobile Connection BIBFull-Text 59-60
  Brian Romanko

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

Audiophoto narratives for semi-literate communities BIBFull-Text 61-64
  David Frohlich; Matt Jones

FEATURE

Think before you link: controlling ubiquitous availability BIBFull-Text 65-68
  Karen Renaud; Judith Ramsay; Mario Hair

(P)REVIEW

HCI, life and death, and Randy Pausch BIBFull-Text 70-71
  Fred Sampson; Keith Instone

INTERACTIONS CAFE

On mobile communication, cultural norms... BIBFull-Text 72
  Richard Anderson; Jon Koike