HCI Bibliography Home | HCI Journals | About FTHCI | Journal Info | FTHCI Journal Volumes | Detailed Records | RefWorks | EndNote | Hide Abstracts
FTHCI Tables of Contents: 01020304050607

Foundations and Trends in Human-Computer Interaction 5

Editors:Ben Bederson
Dates:2012/2013
Volume:5
Publisher:Now Publishers
Standard No:ISSN 1551-3955 (print) 1551-3963 (elec)
Papers:4
Links:www.nowpublishers.com | Table of Contents
  1. FTHCI 20112012-07-05 Volume 5 Issue 1
  2. FTHCI 20112012-12-12 Volume 5 Issue 2
  3. FTHCI 20112013-02-22 Volume 5 Issue 3
  4. FTHCI 20112013-06-26 Volume 5 Issue 4

FTHCI 20112012-07-05 Volume 5 Issue 1

Pervasive Computing for Hospital, Chronic, and Preventive Care BIBAKFull-Text 1-95
  Monica Tentori; Gillian R. Hayes; Madhu Reddy
An emerging area of great impact and significance is the application of pervasive computing technologies in healthcare. Pervasive healthcare refers to the set of technologies designed to seamlessly integrate health education, interventions, and monitoring technology into our everyday lives, regardless of space and time. This approach can increase both the coverage and quality of care. Over the last decade, pervasive computing solutions for healthcare have become increasingly prevalent in both research and commercial efforts. This survey analyzes a variety of research projects and commercial solutions devoted to understanding, designing, and implementing pervasive healthcare applications in support of preventive care, hospital care, and chronic care.
   Taking into account the working conditions of clinicians and the needs of patients, pervasive computing offers a variety of attractive solutions for many of the challenges to care delivery in these domains. The work of clinicians is intrinsically tied to the physical domain of the patient, not to digital material available in computer systems; clinicians as well as other non-clinical caregivers continually switch between different caregiving contexts. Furthermore, their work is characterized by high mobility, ad hoc collaboration, and interruptions. At the same time, patients and family members frequently demonstrate poor adherence to both behavioral and pharmaceutical interventions and experience inadequate communication with those providing care. The use of health education to promote motivation, reinforcement, advice, and tools for capturing and tracking health information supporting self-monitoring can help patients to overcome these challenges. Pervasive computing offers solutions for clinicians, patients, and a variety of other caregivers to assist them with these problems including applications and mechanisms to:
  • ease the recording, tracking, and monitoring of health information;
  • allow communication, collaboration, and coordination among the varied
       stakeholders;
  • encourage clinical adherence and disease prevention;
  • support the nomadic work of clinicians and seamless integration of the
       physical and digital worlds; and
  • enable the development of novel medical devices. In this survey, we present an overview of the history of pervasive healthcare research as a human-centered vision driven by a healthcare model that includes preventive, hospital, and chronic care. We then summarize the research in this space, outlining research challenges, current approaches, results, and trends. Finally, we discuss future research directions as a springboard for new focus in pervasive healthcare. This survey is based on analysis of the literature as well as our own research experiences and those of many of our colleagues.This monograph presents an overview of the history of pervasive healthcare research as a human-centered vision driven by a healthcare model that includes preventive, hospital, and chronic care. It summarizes the research in this space, outlining research challenges, current approaches, results, and trends.
    Keywords: Assistive technologies
  • FTHCI 20112012-12-12 Volume 5 Issue 2

    Foundational Issues in Touch-Surface Stroke Gesture Design -- An Integrative Review BIBAFull-Text 97-205
      Shumin Zhai; Per Ola Kristensson; Caroline Appert; Tue Haste Anderson; Xiang Cao
    Foundational Issues in Touch-Surface Stroke Gesture Design -- An Integrative Review synthesizes some of the foundational issues of human motor control complexity, visual and auditory feedback, and memory and learning capacity concerning gesture user interfaces.The potential for using stroke gestures to enter, retrieve and select commands and text has been recently unleashed by the popularity of touchscreen devices. This monograph provides a state-of-the-art integrative review of a body of human-computer interaction research on stroke gestures. It begins with an analysis of the design dimensions of stroke gestures as an interaction medium. The analysis classifies gestures into analogue versus abstract gestures, gestures for commands versus for symbols, gestures with different orders of complexity, visual-spatial dependent and independent gestures, and finger versus stylus drawn gestures. Gesture interfaces such as the iOS interface, the Graffiti text entry method for Palm devices, marking menus, and the SHARK/Shape Writer word-gesture keyboard, make different choices in this multi-dimensional design space.
       The main body of this work consists of reviewing and synthesizing some of the foundational studies in the literature on stroke gesture interaction, particularly those done by the authors in the last decade. The human performance factors covered include motor control complexity, visual and auditory feedback, and human memory capabilities in dealing with gestures. Based on these foundational studies this review presents a set of design principles for creating stroke gesture interfaces. These include making gestures analogous to physical effects or cultural conventions, keeping gestures simple and distinct, defining stroke gestures systematically, making them self-revealing, supporting appropriate levels of chunking, and facilitating progress from visually guided performance to recall-driven performance. The overall theme is on making learning gestures easier while designing for long-term efficiency. Important system implementation issues of stroke gesture interfaces such as gesture recognition algorithms and gesture design toolkits are also covered in this review. The monograph ends with a few call-to-action research topics.

    FTHCI 20112013-02-22 Volume 5 Issue 3

    Interactive Information Visualization to Explore and Query Electronic Health Records BIBAKFull-Text 207-298
      Alexander Rind; Taowei David Wang; Wolfgang Aigner; Silvia Miksch; Krist Wongsuphasawat; Catherine Plaisant; Ben Shneiderman
    Physicians are confronted with increasingly complex patient histories based on which they must make life-critical treatment decisions. At the same time, clinical researchers are eager to study the growing databases of patient histories to detect unknown patterns, ensure quality control, and discover surprising outcomes. Designers of Electronic Health Record systems (EHRs) have great potential to apply innovative visual methods to support clinical decision-making and research. This work surveys the state-of-the-art of information visualization systems for exploring and querying EHRs, as described in the scientific literature. We examine how systems differ in their features and highlight how these differences are related to their design and the medical scenarios they tackle. The systems are compared on a set of criteria: (1) data types covered, (2) multivariate analysis support, (3) number of patient records used (one or multiple), and (4) user intents addressed. Based on our survey and evidence gained from evaluation studies, we believe that effective information visualization can facilitate analysis of EHRs for patient treatment and clinical research. Thus, we encourage the information visualization community to study the application of their systems in health care. Our monograph is written for both scientific researchers and designers of future user interfaces for EHRs. We hope it will help them understand this vital domain and appreciate the features and virtues of existing systems, so they can create still more advanced systems. We identify potential future research topics in interactive support for data abstraction, in systems for intermittent users, such as patients, and in more detailed evaluations.This work surveys the state-of-the-art of information visualization systems for exploring and querying Electronic Health Record systems (EHRs). It examines how systems differ in their features and highlights how these differences are related to their design and the medical scenarios that they tackle.
    Keywords: Electronic health records, Healthcare, Interactive visual interfaces, Visual Analytics, Visual exploration, Visual queries

    FTHCI 20112013-06-26 Volume 5 Issue 4

    Some Whys and Hows of Experiments in Human-Computer Interaction BIBAFull-Text 299-373
      Kasper Hornbæk
    Experiments help to understand human-computer interaction and to characterize the value of user interfaces. Yet, few intermediate guidelines exist on how to design, run, and report experiments. The present monograph presents such guidelines. We briefly argue why experiments are invaluable for advancing human-computer interaction beyond technical innovation. We then identify heuristics of doing good experiments, including how to build on existing work in devising hypotheses and selecting measures; how to craft challenging comparisons, rather than biased win-lose setups; how to design experiments so as to rule out alternative explanations; how to provide evidence for conclusions; and how to narrate findings. These heuristics are exemplified by excellent experiments in human-computer interaction.Some Whys and Hows of Experiments in Human-Computer Interaction presents guidelines on how to design, run, and report experiments in Human-Computer Interaction. It identifies heuristics of doing good experiments, including how to build on existing work in devising hypotheses and selecting measures; how to craft challenging comparisons, rather than biased win-lose setups; how to design experiments so as to rule out alternative explanations; how to provide evidence for conclusions; and how to narrate findings.