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SIGDOC Tables of Contents: 192021222324

ACM SIGDOC *Journal of Computer Documentation 21

Editors:T. R. Girill
Dates:1997
Volume:21
Publisher:ACM
Standard No:ISSN 0731-1001
Papers:29
Links:Table of Contents
  1. SIGDOC 1997 Volume 21 Issue 1
  2. SIGDOC 1997 Volume 21 Issue 2
  3. SIGDOC 1997 Volume 21 Issue 3
  4. SIGDOC 1997 Volume 21 Issue 4

SIGDOC 1997 Volume 21 Issue 1

Using Problem Analysis to Support Decisions and Planning in Complex Processes BIBA 3-14
  Chris Hallgren
Hallgren argues that besides addressing the routine tasks users perform, adequate documentation must also anticipate the problems they will face when deciding which tasks to perform or when planning complex tasks. He illustrates the extra explanatory features of problem-centered documentation with three before-and-after comparative miniature case studies based on actual documentation passages. Accompanying Hallgren's article are 10 pages of detailed analytical commentary on his claims, in three evaluative essays by Stephen W. Draper, Arthur G. Elser, and Bob Waite.

Commentary

New Guises for Recurring Problems in Documentation BIB 15-18
  Stephen W. Draper
Complex Problems: What's the Next Step? BIB 19-22
  Authur G. Elser
Documenting Complex Processes: Educating the User and Simplifying the Task BIB 23-25
  Bob Waite

Awareness essay

Annotated Bibliography on Internationalization and Localization BIBA 26-33
  Emmanuel Uren
Summarizing years of practical experience in his notes and commentary, Uren systematically reviews the recent literature about internationalization and localization, briefly evaluating over 4 dozen articles and books along with many relevant standards (all grouped by operating system or platform where appropriate). "Localizing software," he explains with astute examples, "requires more than translating documentation and the [user] interface" into another language.

News

SIGDOC97 Conference Call for Papers BIB 34-35
  Karl Smart
News of the Profession: Thanks and WWW Usability Too BIB 36-37
  T. R. Girill

SIGDOC 1997 Volume 21 Issue 2

Book commentary

Computerized Workplace Writing BIBA 2-9
  Scott DeLoach
DeLoach critically analyzes every essay in the 1996 anthology by Patricia Sullivan and Jeannie Dautermann called Electronic Literacies in the Workplace, looking for insights on how academic training intersects with writing in industry. He finds that schools need to teach about time and budget constraints as well as drafting techniques if students are to be adequately prepared for work life. And he concludes that the open, egalitarian environment that writers seek when they move from school to work must be justified in economic terms if business practice is to change.

Awareness essay

What's Going on in Indexing? BIBA 10-15
  Nancy C. Mulvany
While summarizing and evaluating the recent literature on indexing and its relevance to computer documentation, Mulvany defends three claims: (1) An index is one of the most important features of a manual. (2) Adequate indexes are produced by skilled professionals; they are not just computer-generated word lists. (3) Even in online documentation, professionally constructed indexes add value that cannot be duplicated by summarization software or text-search programs.
The Linguistics of Links: Hyperphoric Grammar Markups for HTML Documents BIBA 16-21
  David W. Norton
Just as linguistic clarity about traditional referencing features in text improves that text's usefulness, argues Norton, so can linguistic analysis of between-document ("hyperphoric") interactive links improve the usefulness of HTML documents. Norton undertakes that analysis and finds four distinct kinds of link. He then suggests how HTML browsers could exploit those link types to alter their labels and prompts to present more useful displays of online text.
Table of Contents Service for Instructional Science BIB 22-32
  T. R. Girill

News

SIGDOC97 Conference: The Theme, The Venue, and How to Learn More BIB 33-34
  Karl Smart

SIGDOC 1997 Volume 21 Issue 3

Classic reprint

What is Text Really? BIBA 1-25
  Steven J. DeRose; David G. Durand; Elli Mylonas; Allen H. Renear
Document processing software always assumes one or another "model of text." The authors of this reprinted classic paper, originally published in the Journal of Computing in Higher Education in 1990, compare six different text models to argue that the intellectually strongest as well as the most practical is an "ordered hierarchy of content objects" (OHCO). This model also supports SGML. Accompanying this reprint are three commentaries that explore its assumptions and weaknesses. S. Selber contends that the OHCO model is "arhetorical" (pp. 26-31). C. Hill notes that HTML confuses the style and content issues raised here (pp. 32-35). And R. S. Dicks thinks the OHCO approach ignores the graphical aspects of text (pp. 36-39). In a closing response, the original authors retrospectively review their earlier claims and reply to each commentator's suggestions (pp. 40-44).

Commentary

The OHCO Model of Text: Merits and Concerns BIB 26-31
  Stuart A. Selber
Markup Meets the Mainstream: The Future of Content-Based Processing BIB 32-35
  Charles Hill
Third Commentary on "What is Text Really?" BIB 36-39
  R. Stanley Dicks
Further Context for "What is Text Really?" BIB 40-44
  Steven J. DeRose; David G. Durand; Elli Mylonas; Allen H. Renear

Awareness essay

Performance Systems Technology and Computer-Based Instruction (Part I) BIBA 45-55
  Gloria A. Reece
Although performance support and computer-aided training are not the same, they share many goals, techniques, design criteria, and research publications. In this comprehensive literature-awareness essay, Reece uses a careful conceptual survey (and comparison) of these fields as the means to review the professional societies, annual conferences, web sites, published case studies, and prime reference material relevant to both areas.

News

SIGDOC97: Lodging and Registration Details BIB 56-63
  Karl Smart

SIGDOC 1997 Volume 21 Issue 4

The Wired Neighborhood: An Extended Multimedia Conversation BIB 1
  Bob Johnson
A Descriptive Summary of The Wired Neighborhood BIB 2-3
  Becky Graham

Book commentary

Hitting Home: Communication Technologies and the Everyday BIBA 4-7
  Becky Graham
This is the first of three related, comparative review essays in which students or teachers of rhetoric analyze Stephen Doheny-Farina's book The Wired Neighborhood (Yale, 1996). Graham focuses on the social implications of networked computing, giving special attention to Doheny-Farina's claims about the possible negative effects of networking on local schools (because of distance education) and on work-place organization (because of telecommuting).
What Computer Networks Can't Do BIBA 8-10
  Mike Rubingh
In this second of three related, comparative review essays, Rubingh draws many striking parallels between Doheny-Farina's skeptical claims about computer networks and the similarly skeptical claims about artificial intelligence presented by philosopher Hubert Dreyfus in his 1972 book on What Computers Can't Do. Both authors argue that overlooking the importance of geography and physical place leads to serious conceptual problems with computers and with their simulations of real-life activities.
The Wired Neighborhood: An Online Conversation BIBA 11-15
  Nancy Allen; Ann Blakeslee
Allen and Blakeslee construct this third in a series of three comparative review essays in dialog format, so they can conversationally undermine some of Doheny-Farina's pessimism about computer networks. They contend that not only do networks promote geographically scattered professional communities whose members could not otherwise collaborate easily, but networks also sometimes reinforce natural, local communities (towns or school districts) as well.
Interview with Stephen Doheny-Farina BIBA 16-19
  Stephen Doheny-Farina
Author Doheny-Farina comments on all his Wired Neighborhood commentators in an interview that immediately follows the three review essays.

Awareness essay

Performance Systems Technology and Computer-Based Instruction (Part II) BIBA 20-25
  Gloria A. Reece
In this second part of her comprehensive literature-awareness essay (Part I appeared in the August issue), Reece completes her comparison of the two title topics by summarizing several decades in their parallel literature. One detailed table surveys the history of hypertext systems. A second catalogs dozens of journals related to instructional technology. And two other tables graphically summarize key PST and CBI functions and roles.
A Seven-Dimensional Approach to Graphics BIBA 26-37
  Danny Dowhal
In the course of this introductory conceptual tour for documentation professionals, Dowhal perceptively and systematically explains, contrasts, and illustrates the design value of points (pixels), lines (vectors), shapes, 2-D graphics that simulate 3-D graphics, true 3-D models, simulated motion, actual animated graphics, and visual material enhanced with emotion, sound, or human interaction.
Table of Contents Service for Journal of Business and Technical Communication BIB 38-44
  T. R. Girill
SIGDOC98 Call for Participation BIB 45-49
  Phyllis Galt